Fave 5: Magazines gone bust

We read A LOT of magazines on the fourth floor. Aside from being an integral part of PR, a new magazine arriving at the office calls for a break to check out the latest trends, beauty tips and celebrity gossip. But we also get really, really sad when a magazine announces it’s ceasing publication – it’s like losing a trusted friend. Today, a tribute to five magazines we still miss.

Domino

If you re-pin decor pics on Pinterest, you’ve likely pinned from Domino.
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We all let out a collective scream when Domino announced its last issue in 2009. There’s a reason why every second living room on Apartment Therapy contains the ever-familiar mint green book, Domino: The Book of Decorating. Every issue contained page after page of beautiful inspiration, chic interiors and refreshing ideas. Type Domino Magazine into Pinterest to see what you missed. 

You can get your fix this month with a special new edition, Domino Quick Fixes, that is currently on newsstands. Their revived Facebook page is also addressing important questions such as “to colour-coordinate or not to colour-coordinate bookshelves?”. Could this be the return? We can only hope. 

Sassy

Yes, that’s Milla Jovovich, circa 1991.
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The thought that there are girls out there not getting advice on relationships, sex, body image and how to grow up to be a cool chick from Sassy makes us worry about their generation. Founded by Jane Pratt, the magazine offered (as its name suggests), a sassy, sometimes-controversial, feminist voice for young girls. The magazine was published until 1994, which makes us feel a little old, and also wonder if our mothers knew what we were reading. Need a fix? We’re enjoying a lookback with this Sassy Magazine LIVES tumblr. 

Jane

Premiere issue of Jane, with covergirl Drew Barrymore (who Jane claims to have had an affair with).
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Luckily for 90s girls, Jane magazine stepped in to fill the void left by Sassy, running from 1997 to 2007. Also headed by Jane Pratt, the magazine was said to ‘appeal to women who are irreverent’. If you’re still lamenting these magazines, we’re sure you already know about xoJane.com, where you can go for a daily dose of the irreverent.

Wish

A little bit of everything.
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Headed by another well-known Jane, the subject matter was tamer but featured lovely pieces covering fashion, beauty, home and food. Running for five years, the magazine was shut down at the end of 2008. We still pull out old issues to check out  20-minute Supper Club, a feature that planned out meals for a week, including wine pairings.  

Blueprint

RIP Blueprint, 2006-2008.
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Part of the Martha Stewart Living brand, Blueprint was targeted to a younger demographic than Martha Stewart Living, one that enjoyed pretty DIYs, fancy cocktails and decor inspiration for small spaces when you don’t have a manor like Martha’s. We consult our archives when there’s an occasion that calls for a little Martha: first turkey dinner cooked for the extended fam, an inkling to make a wreath that doesn’t look like grandma’s, the desire to plant a herb garden in a windowbox, you know…





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