Rave: Happy first Anniversary Loblaws at Maple Leaf Gardens!

It’s
been a whole year since Loblaw gave new life to the historic Maple Leaf
Gardens, and today the store is kicking off Food’s Greatest Celebration – a weekend
of can’t miss activities and contests. 


Photo credit: JJ Thompson/medianeeds.ca
Pretty ballet dancers 

After four days of construction, 1,000 tiles of gingerbread, 5,000 mini candy canes and 700 pounds of candy (!!), the 17-foot President’s Choice® Giant Holiday Gingerbread House was unveiled and all lit up in twinkling lights early this morning. Was it ever a sight to see…

Photo credit: JJ Thompson/medianeeds.ca

Santa Claus is spending the day greeting guests from the President’s Choice® Giant Holiday Gingerbread House. Been good this year? Starting today until the end of the holiday season, Santa and his elves will be on hand inside the gingerbread house every weekend, ready for photo ops and to get a sneak peek at what’s on your Christmas list.

The
Marty Oakes Trio starts off a weekend of live music today until 3 p.m., with the
Ryan Oliver Jazz Duo from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, December 1. The Mary Mac Duo wraps things up on Sunday, December 2 with a performance from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. With the soundtrack set, you’ll be ready to
take part in daily contests (like today’s pizza making challenge) led by top
food experts for your chance to win a ton of prizes.


Photo credit: JJ Thompson/medianeeds.ca

This lucky shopper was one of the first 400 customers through the
doors at 7 a.m. today – and won
$5,000 worth of Loblaws gift
cards!


You
know we can’t stay away from a celebration, and with this much to see, hear and
taste this weekend at the Loblaws Store at Maple Leaf Gardens – you know where to find us.  




#loblawscarlton1yr

*Reg’d TM. Lic’d use.



Media, Darling: Adina Goldman

Adina Goldman is
senior editor at iVillage Canada,
the web’s oldest and largest content-driven community for women. Most of her
career has involved writing, editing and producing digital content for various
media properties, from television (CHUM/CTV) to public radio (CBC Toronto). She
is passionate about the intersection of technology and storytelling. As someone
who’s kept a blog for 12 years and obsessively updates her social media feeds,
she finds it weirdly difficult to write her own bio. But perhaps that’s because
she’s writing it in the third person…
.



Photo credit: Rannie Turingan



Twitter: @ponyup @iVillageCanada 
Website: iVillage.ca, www.happyrobot.net 

Did you always want
to be in the media? If not, what other careers were on the horizon?

I went to school for
creative writing, but oddly they were not snatching up poets at recruitment
agencies. Like so many kids with English degrees, I did some freelance and
copywriting, and even played with the idea of advertising. But I was really
lucky with timing, because this thing called The Internet happened. And there
was suddenly a niche of web content where they kind of let you do your own
thing, as long as you put it on the “Web Page”. I hope it’s not a passing fad.

Where would you like
to be five years from now?

I want to be working
wherever people are playful with new technology platforms and using them to
tell great stories.

Any advice for people
getting started in your industry?
This is the best time
in history to share your creations. Make stuff yourself, get your voice out
there and build your community! If you’re reasonably sure you’re in the right
field, imagine the future of your industry five years from now, and point your
efforts in that direction.



What are your
favourite media outlets, not including your own?
I think much of what
we consume these days is via social media. We rely on our friends to recommend
parse the daily deluge of information. That said, we are CBC radio
junkies at our house, but I listen to a lot of NPR podcasts when I’m cooking or
on the go. I love all the city blogs, like Torontoist
and The Toronto Standard
for their creative local coverage. For writer-y stuff, I love The Rumpus, The New Yorker and The Walrus.
My sister co-founded 972Mag.com, a great and
popular alternative source for Middle East news.

Style: I am a sucker
for The Sartorialist.com
(although there are so many amazing Canadian
fashion bloggers
). Music: 3Hive.com. Huffpo
does a snacky mix of popular culture and current events. Food52.com is my favourite recipe resource
these days. Also, I read People
Magazine
religiously. Channing Tatum FTW.



Best interview you’ve
ever had?
I used to be web
producer for SPACE, so I had
the opportunity to meet and interview people who are a Big Deal in the genre
universe but often go unnoticed in the mainstream. They were the coolest
interview subjects hands-down because they had such a great sense of humour and
humility about their celebrity.

Worst?
Isn’t there only such
thing as a bad journalist? Maybe I need to do more interviews.

Best advice you’ve
ever been given?
Use fewer adjectives
and avoid restaurants where they have pictures of their food on the menu.

What rule(s) do you
live your life by?
Don’t believe
everything you read in the comments section.

What’s the most
important tip you can give PR pros?
If you want me to
take a product seriously, avoid writing about it in pink comic sans font. Send
attachments rather than embedded images in the email body. And maybe try to
look a little dishevelled every now and then when you see me so that I don’t
feel like such a schlump.

Best experience
you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins. 

I have so much
respect for the PR pros in my life. How are you always so nice and remember my
name? How do you always look so polished? How do you not suffer from post-event
social fatigue? I can’t pick a favourite, only to say that the best experiences
always have a good measure of authenticity and genuine enthusiasm for the
client.

I hate?
Misused apostrophes.

I love?
People who sing when
they ride their bikes.

Reading?
I recently finished Wild
by Cheryl Strayed.
Oprah and I have excellent taste, it is a stunning read. Caitlin Moran’s How
to Be a Woman
was hilarious and edifying. Read it now if you’ve ever hemmed
and hawed when asked whether you’re a feminist.

Best place on earth?
Cooking dinner with
my family, listening to music, my five year-old singing along at the top of his
lungs.

Dinner guest?
Oh, I love to host
dinner parties. Would you like to come?

Hero?
Funny you should
mention this. I am in the market for a new hero. Accepting applications
via my twitter feed @ponyup.

Favourite app (or
whatever you are downloading these days)?
I recently used the Couch to 5K app (C25K) app for
nine weeks and it turned me into a (slow but dedicated) runner. If you know me
at all, you will appreciate the mystical power of this app.

Pool or ocean?
Am I holding a cocktail
in this scenario?

Voicemail or email?
I check my phone
messages once a week. How patient are you?


Rave: One of a Kind Show

The One of a Kind Show is something that you’ve likely heard of, and possibly have been to, since it’s been happening in Toronto since 1975. It started as the brainchild of Steven Levy, Martin Rumack and June Bibby, when Bibby couldn’t find anywhere to sell her work. They created the craft show and it’s since grown to represent more than 800 artisans, designers and craftspeople, and is the largest consumer craft show in North America.


And big it is – luckily it runs for more than a week (from Thursday, November 22 to Sunday, December 2), which is great because there’s no way you can visit each booth in just a day. We recently took a trip to the Direct Energy Centre to check it out and were blown away by the talent and creativity in the room (we were a bit skeptical that it was going to resemble a church basement craft sale, if we’re honest). There were literally hundreds of things we could have snapped up from handmade flavoured peanut butters, to uniquely-flavoured shortbread, to the cutest little baby outfits and toys, funky jewellery and a ton of art.


Here are some of the great items that we saw (and sampled):


Diane Stewart from Blind River, Ontario, creates “paintings” out of layered strips of fabric. Love this brand-new lace piece showing a waterfall cascading down a series of rocks. Gorgeous (Diane doesn’t have a website but you can contact her by email at dianestewart.artist@gmail.com if you’re interested). 


 
Lace waterfall detail. 



Fidoodle creates really funky baby toys, that will still appeal to a young parent’s aesthetic. We particularly loved this little doll in primary colours that flips upside down to reveal a butterfly girl. 




Kino Guerin creates hanging chalkboards with his signature curved wood pieces, and the slate salvaged from old house rooftops. They sell for about $300-500 depending on the size, and are worth every penny. 


One of the best sections of the show was the “rising stars” area, which featured young, up-and-coming artisans, designers and jewellery makers. The best piece for sale (in our opinion) was the collaboration  between graphic designer Evann Frisque and found vintage lighting seller Mod Pieces. They created anatomically correct printed lampshades atop one-of-a-kind lamps. 

Another creative lighting option was found in the Wine Planks booth, where Cathy Davison deconstructs used wine barrels into awesome pieces for your home. Everyone was going crazy for the wooden strips turned into candle holders, but we loved the garden balls made from the metal hoops that hold the barrels together. They’re meant for outside, but we picked one up for our dining room (for the low, low price of $50). 


We Beet Everything makes killer beet-based dips, including our favourite, Sassy Horseradish (because, obviously we’ll buy anything that incorporates sassiness). Beets + horseradish = the best new flavour combo.



We instantly thought of our West Queen West bike riding friends when we saw these awesome bike bells. Made by noted Montreal sculpturist Glen Le Mesurier, he’s best known for big, outdoor metal sculptures. But we were into his Star Trek and Toronto bike bells.



One of the best young artists we saw was Patrick Lajoie, who created original woodprints from photographs that he took. They were Canadiana at it’s best, and solidified our commitment to collecting Canadian art. The affordable price tags also helped – each bigger print was about $300-600, making it easy for us to envision a few hanging on the walls.





There you have it! Not just a show for crafty moms and wrinkled old ladies. Get there before it ends – you will love it.

Rave: The Big Band Show

As we’re on the cusp of the holiday month, prepare yourself to be bombarded with Christmas carols, candy cane-flavoured everything and Santa Clauses at every turn. If you’re like us, it’s likely one of your favourite holiday traditions is The Nutcracker ballet. The National Ballet has you covered on that front, with their annual production running from December 19 to January 5. However, if you’re looking to get into the festive spirit a bit sooner, then we’ve got the show for you!

Mr. Andrew Burashko

Art of Time Ensemble is one of Canada’s most innovative and artistically accomplished music ensembles, led by the inimitable Andrew Burashko. Their latest show is The Big Band Show, which features a 25-piece (you guessed it) big band on-stage. Classically-trained musicians are joined on-stage by some of Canada’s most renown jazz giants, to share the power and beauty of big band sound with audiences. 

There aren’t any tights on the Art of Time stage.



Now, you’re probably asking yourself “what the heck does that have to do with The Nutcracker, goddammit?!”. Well, we’re glad you asked. As you may know, The Nutcracker ballet is set to music by Tchaikovsky. What you probably do not know is that jazz great Duke Ellington re-imagined the classic score through the prism of jazz. Pretty cool, eh? Transforming the romantic orchestral composition into jumping jazz melodies is quite the feat, but not for Ellington! The cool cat takes the gorgeous classic and turns it on its head, resulting in the hip Nutcracker Suite

Duke tickling the ivories.



The Nutcracker Suite is the jewel of the program, which also includes Stravinsky’s Ebony Concerto and Shostakovich’s Jazz Suite No. 1. All three pieces are very rarely performed and, to our knowledge, have never been performed together. The Big Band Show plays tribute to both classical and jazz music, and the relationship between the two genres.

Dmitri Shostakovich, one of the greatest classical composers of 20th century.



The show opens on November 30 and runs until December 1. It’s a short run (only two performances), which makes it even more special. Some people buy limited edition purses, but how many people have seen limited edition big band shows? Not many, that’s for sure. Grab some hot chocolate, spike it if you like (we won’t tell) and kick off the holidays with some culture. You fancy, huh? 


Tickets from $25 to $59 are available online at harbourfrontcentre.com,
by phone at 416.973.4000 or in-person at the box office.



*All images courtesy of Art of Time Ensemble, unless otherwise noted. 

Fave Five: Young Local Artists

Here on the fourth floor, we appreciate
the finer things in life and as such, are taking a moment to honour our Fave
Five young Torontonians who contribute to the arts and entertainment scene
in Toronto.



Li-Hill
Born and raised in Toronto and a
graduate of OCAD’s fine art program, Aaron Li-Hill is one of our favourite visual
artists. His dreamy, industrial inspired
pieces employ a variety of mediums; from traditional paints and sketches to a
contemporary use of graphic design and graffiti. His art has been shown in galleries
throughout Canada and was recently included in SPiN Toronto’s first Plywood graffiti
art exhibit. http://li-hill.carbonmade.com/


Little.White.Dress
Not only do we love fashion, we also
love Mother Earth! This is why Little.White.Dress is a local
designer that we’re keeping our eye on. Made up of Ryerson grads
Jessica van Enckevort and Alexandra Wilson, Little.White.Dress focuses on
making unique, eco-friendly bridal wear, cocktail dresses and accessories. We
love their use of vintage and repurposed fabrics, and that each of their
dresses is one of a kind. @LWDressToronto



Devin
Cuddy
No stranger to the Canadian music
scene, Devin was literally born into it. Son of Blue Rodeo’s Jim Cuddy, Devin inherited more than just the famous
Can-Rock name and has been carving out a place for himself with the Devin Cuddy Band. Their country and New Orleans
blues inspired debut album Volume One was released on the Cameron House’s label, where Devin and his band can be
spotted playing every Wednesday. @DevinCuddy


Petra
Collins
Photog phenom Petra Collins  has made
her indelible mark on the art world with her nostalgic, sometimes
controversial, but always honest portrayal of young women. At just 19 years old,
Petra’s commercial clients include Urban
Outfitters, Vogue Italia, Chloe Comme Parris and Refinery 29.  In addition to that, she curates the female
art collective The Ardorous We love her unapologetic embrace of all
things feminine. @petracollins





Shasha
Nakhai
Since she moved to Toronto from Nigeria
as an international student in Ryerson’s Broadcast Journalism program,
Shasha has been an up-and-comer in the documentary film world.  She works full-time at award-winning
documentary production company Storyline Entertainment, and as a
producer/director for Squire Entertainment with Rich Williamson. Her very first documentary Baby
Not Mine
went on to win awards at the Human Rights Docfest and the Montreal
World Film Festival in 2009. Recently,
her documentary about the sugarcane industry in the Philippines, The Sugar Bowl  took Best Documentary and
Best Film at the 2012 Aesthetica Short Film Festival in York, UK. @ShashaNakhai

DIY: Detachable Collars

We are loving the detachable collar trend. A collar can instantly add flair to a simple top, sweater or dress. The options are endless – you only need to tweak shape and material: from peter pan pearl to gold cuff to shiny or pointy rock-star-glam. While we love hitting up the shops, we thought this trend would be a perfect opportunity to infuse our own creativity in something simple, inexpensive and chic.


We decided to try a few versions of this fun and simple DIY project. The processes of making the pearl and sequin collars are quite similar, but demonstrate how varied the result can be due to changes in collar shape and materials.


Pearl collar:


Shopping list: a piece of felt, strands of pearls, goop glue or a glue gun, a needle and thread, thin ribbon, scissors and a felt tip pen.
  1. Outline the shape you want your collar to be on the felt.
  2. Fold the felt in half to cut out a symmetrical shape.
  3. Lie the felt flat and measure out the length of the pearl strands, adjusting the length to fit (tip: leave some extra space on the strand so that it will bend easily)
  4. Cut the length of ribbon in half and sew it to the ends of the felt.
  5. Apply glue to the entire surface of the felt.
  6. Press the strands of pearls into place on the glue.
  7. Use loose pearls to fill in additional spaces – this will make the collar look full.
  8. Leave to dry.
Sequin collar:


Shopping list: a piece of felt, a long length of sequins, goop glue or a glue gun, a needle and thread, thin ribbon, scissors and a felt tip pen.
  1. Outline the shape you want your collar to be on the felt.
  2. Fold the felt in half to cut out a symmetrical shape.
  3. Lie the felt flat and measure out the length of the sequin strands, adjusting the length to fit.
  4. Cut the length of ribbon in half and sew it to the ends of the felt.
  5. Apply glue to the entire surface of the felt.
  6. Press the strands of sequins into place on the glue.
  7. Use loose sequins to fill in additional space.
  8. Leave to dry.
Ribbon collar:
Shopping list: a piece of felt, a long length of thick ribbon, a needle and thread, thin ribbon, scissors and a felt tip pen.
  1. Outline a semi-circle on the felt.
  2. Fold the felt in half to cut out a symmetrical shape.
  3. Sew a piece of thin ribbon on one end of the felt.
  4. Fold the end under the thick ribbon and stitch it down at one end so that it completely covers the felt.
  5. Fold the ribbon over so that it covers the completed stitch and stitch this fold down.
  6. Continue this process until nearly at the end of the felt.
  7. Stitch the second piece of thin ribbon to the end of the felt.
  8. Cut the thick ribbon off with enough space to fold its end under and cover the felt and previous stitch.
  9. Stitch the final fold down and it is ready to wear.

Additional Ideas:




Now that we’re comfortable with the basics of this DIY, we’re going to let our creativity run wild and try some of these other shapes, colours and embellishments. 


Media, Darling: Jessica Allen

Jessica Allen is an assistant editor at Maclean’s magazine where she writes and edits for the website in the areas of arts and culture, and makes podcasts and videos. After work, she maintains her personal food blog, Foodie and the Beast, and is the editor-in-chief of T Magazine, a bi-annual publication put out by Terroni restaurant, a Toronto Italian restaurant that she worked at for nearly a decade. During that time she completed a Master’s degree in the history of art at the University of Toronto and spent a year teaching art history in Florence, Italy. Jessica’s TIFF coverage in 2011, her first time reporting on the festival, earned Maclean’s a National Magazine Award nomination.


Did you
always want to be in the media? If not, what other careers were on the horizon?
Well, as a kid I really wanted to be a
cashier, a waitress or a writer because I loved cash registers and typewriters.
I was very good at pressing buttons. Some might even say gifted. I also used to
host my own radio show that I’d tape on a little cassette recorder from the
living room floor, in private, when I was seven. Topics included: Why does my
brother like Star Wars so much? How
do you make musical instruments from stuff you find in the kitchen? How do they
make those Strawberry Shortcake dolls smell so good? And…Holy s- – t. I just
realized I’ve been a cashier, a waitress, a writer and a podcast host, which is
kind of like being on the radio. I have achieved all my childhood dreams.

Where
would you like to be five years from now?
Surrounded by friends and family at an
intimate, modest book launch. And maybe the book would have my byline. Or maybe
not.  But it would still be a lovely evening
with wine, cheese (fancy kinds) and crackers that would all be FREE.

Any
advice for people getting started in your industry?
Most days I feel like I’m still getting
started. But for freelancers, I’d suggest avoiding emailing an editor with,
“I’d love to write for you. What are you looking for?” It’s just a bit vague.
Do a little homework and see what sort of stories are making the cut and then
pitch a specific idea. And ideally, those queries should reflect who the writer
is, that they can write and that they have a clear idea for a solid story. If
the pitch is vague, boring and poorly written, chances are, the story will be
too.

What
are your favourite media outlets, not including your own?
Right now I subscribe to three
publications: the New Yorker, the National Post and Bon
Appétit.
My dad suggested to me 15 years ago, when I was probably reading Sassy, to start reading the New Yorker: if you want to be a better
writer, he said, then read good writing and cross your fingers that some of
that fine craft on the page will be absorbed. I don’t read each issue
cover-to-cover, but man, does it manage to both entertain and enlighten. I love the ritual of first looking at the contents
and mapping out what I’ll read. I’ll usually jump to something by my favourite
contributors, like Amy Ozols, Tad Friend or Calvin Trillin. And I especially
love that the stuff I might resist reading at first, usually ends up being my
favourite. Reading the National Post
is my morning ritual. I like to think that it keeps me sharp because I don’t
always agree with the positions of the columnists and trying to articulate—or
at least think about—why that is, is a nice little exercise with morning
coffee. And since Adam Rapaport from GQ
came on board as editor-in-chief at Bon
Appétit,
I’ve been thrilled with that magazine. And I do love television but don’t have
cable so I just keep watching my favourite shows in rotation: The Sopranos, Deadwood and Northern
Exposure
.
Best
interview you’ve ever had?
This September on
the red carpet of a movie called Quartet
,
directed by Dustin Hoffman and starring Maggie Smith and Billy Connolly. We had
a chance to talk with all three of them on the red carpet for the film’s
premiere at TIFF.  And man oh man did
they bring it! That is how you do a
red carpet. And their enthusiasm, humour and professionalism made me feel a
little less sympathetic to other celebrities who slinked their way down the
carpet, with little verve or vigour, giving one word answers.
Worst?
I once had a scheduled phone interview
with a Toronto chef of international renown. He didn’t answer my first three
calls. He picked up on the fourth though, but asked if I could call back in an
hour. There were a couple of more no answers. By the time I got him, he was
talking to three or four other people in the background at the same time as me.
That was a tough one.
Best
advice you’ve ever been given?
There are three, and they’re so simple
I’m almost embarrassed to tell you: First, I was doing a video with Maclean’s colleague Brian D. Johnson,
who’s covered TIFF for 27 years now and appears on CityTV every Friday to talk
about the newest movies to hit theatres. I kept flubbing a take and he told me
to slow down and pause if I didn’t know what to say, instead of blabbering on.
GENIUS! Second, Philippe Gohier, a former editor at the magazine who now works
at enRoute, told me not to be afraid
to focus on what I think the best bits are in a story: think about the stuff
I’d be most excited to tell my friends about. 
And finally, my boyfriend, after being appalled over how many times I
interrupted celebrities on
my first TIFF red carpet
—think Anna Faris, Chris Pratt and Brad Pitt—told
me maybe to stop interrupting people in interviews. It’s just that I don’t like
making people uncomfortable and would always fill in the awkward silences. If
you let them do it instead, sometimes magic will happen.
What
rule(s) do you live your life by?

I wish I had more
rules to live my life by, but here’s one: Be nice to people. And hopefully not
because your motivations are selfish: be nice to people, including the security
guard, the cashier, the 
sales clerk or the taxi driver, because
being polite and nice are just good things to be in a world that sometimes
lacks those basic courtesies.


What’s
the most important tip you can give PR pros?
I suppose to do a little research before
emailing a press release or pitch: For example, while I’d love to cover a media
scrum on the Hill in Ottawa that you’ve emailed me a press release about, there
are probably far more capable reporters at Maclean’s
to do the job, even ones who actually work in Ottawa. Also, peg the person,
place or thing you’re promoting to a specific section of the magazine or
website that you know would be a good fit for your pitch. And don’t be alarmed
if I choose not to write about those chipotle-yogurt-acai berry gluten-free
chips that you’ve sent. I’m sure they’re amazing, but our readers might not
understand why I just dedicated 500 words to them. 
Best
experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins.
Last year was my first time covering
TIFF. I was so naïve and had to count on the kindness of PR strangers
(including you fine folks! But it might be considered gauche to recount here.) I
managed to connect with Jennifer Love of Duet PR, who practically held my hand
after I flat out admitted that I was new to TIFF and usually wrote about food. She
did her best to include me at events that might have a culinary focus. One was
a private dinner for a movie called The
Artist
where the star,
Jean Dujardin, director
Michael
Hazanavicius
and producer Harvey Weinstein would be
in attendance. Media wasn’t supposed to be there but I promised to behave and
be a fly on the wall. I ended up sitting with two of the smartest people I’ve
met working in media—Anne Thompson and Dana Harris of Indiewire—and had the time of my life. Hearing Thompson over dinner
confess that:
“I’ve been quoted in print as saying
Ewan McGregor has the most beautiful penis I’ve ever seen. Well, the title now
goes to Michael Fassbender,” was especially memorable, not to mention watching
the Weinstein brothers work the room, or rather, the room working them, and
being privy to New York PR sensation Peggy Siegel doing her thing, were like
scenes out of a movie on the business of making movies. And I
got a great little story out of it to boot
.

I hate?
Chicken on pizza, or in pasta. And
strawberries in rhubarb pie.


I love?
My bike. I ride it everywhere. Sometimes
in heels (don’t recommend.)


Reading?
Currently on the bedside table are A Room With a View (because I just
re-watched the Ivory-Merchant film), Philip Roth’s Zuckerman Unbound, and a food history called Consider the Fork.


Best place
on earth?
Lately, my couch, in home-time comfy
clothes, fire going (in fireplace), one of the above-mentioned TV shows
playing, with my feet on my boyfriend’s lap and a glass of Sancerre resting on
my tummy. (I will take a cheap Italian white, if funds are limited, which is
more often than not.)
Dinner
guest?
Daniel Day Lewis as Nathaniel in Last of the Mohicans, Matt Damon as
Jason Bourne and Brad Pitt as Tristan from
Legends of the Fall
. And if there was room, Russell Crowe as Gladiator. Okay, and Daniel Craig as
007. They would arrive in costume, and be in character the whole night. After
dinner, which I’d prepare at my place, we’d all go sit on the couch with
glasses of bourbon and watch the movies they’re in, or maybe deconstruct
episodes of Girls, and eat a Deep and
Delicious cake out of the container. I’ve said too much.


Hero?
Professionally speaking, Elaine Lui of LaineyGossip. Her writing is not only
hilarious, but it also, for me, blurs the line between high and low culture. If
I’m ever feeling lazy, I think of how much she works, and how she manages to
pump out copy on pop culture that is often so acute and illuminating that I
wonder why she’s not a f–king university professor. (Probably because having
your own gossip website is more fun, and you still get to do TED Talks on the
side.)
Favourite
app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?
I use the LCBO App quite a bit. Probably
too much, actually.


Pool or
ocean?
Always the ocean.

Voicemail
or email?
Always the email.