Media, Darling: Natalia Manzocco

Natalia Manzocco heads up the Homes section and
copy edits at 24 Hours Canada, and writes about fashion and technology for QMI
Agency and Sun Media newspapers. In her “spare time” (a term she uses
extremely loosely) she plays guitar in The Cheap Speakers.



image source: Natalia Manzocco

Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what
other careers were on the horizon?
In grade four, I wrote and designed my own one-page
“newspaper” full of book reviews and handed it out at school. I
probably should have seen this coming, all things considered. 
Things really crystallized in high school, when I learned
that the drummer from Barenaked Ladies (my preteen heroes — I was about as cool
as you might expect) went to Ryerson for radio and television studies. Further
investigation revealed that Ryerson had a well-known journalism program, and
there it was. Thanks, Tyler.
Where would you like to be five years from now?
Surrounded by lifestyle content ’round the clock, working
on putting together a beautiful, engaging and fun product (print, magazine, web
— wherever).
Any advice for people getting started in your industry?
Meet lots of people, be nice to them, and expand your
network of contacts. You never know what doors will open. 
Be prepared to go where the opportunities are; I was
lucky enough to find internships and summer jobs that took me to Calgary and
New Brunswick. Let the wind blow you around.
What are your favourite media outlets, not including your
own?
Truth be told, I probably spend
more time reading the exploits of Twitter’s army of wisecracking Torontonians
than any established media source. But I typically go to the Toronto Star for breaking
news, the New York Times for feats of long-form daring, the Globe and Mail for
a little of each of those things, and Refinery29 and The Cut for fashion
content. I also have severe Lucky Magazine problems. If it takes too long to
show up in my mailbox I start twitching.
Best interview you’ve ever had?
Notable sweet, chatty people include Jason Reitman, Josh
Ritter, and Jay Ferguson from Sloan.
Worst?
I interviewed the drummer from a hardcore band who had
just released his own solo record. He sat reclined on the green room couch with
his feet up and responded to all of my questions like so: Yah. No. Yah. Every
drummer joke I’ve ever heard: validated.
Best advice you’ve ever been given?
I’ve been given plenty, but I also have the memory of a
goldfish. Much the stuff that has stuck with me can be found in the lyrics to
Nada Surf’s 2005 album The Weight Is A Gift.
What rule(s) do you live your life by?
Don’t be afraid to take the shot. If you find a door,
give it a wee push and see what happens.
What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?
This is just going to end up being a list of pet peeves.
I apologize in advance.
– Please don’t call and follow up on a pitch you sent me
that morning. My focus is so limited (homes, tech, style) that I just may not
be able to utilize the pitch you’ve sent. If I can, though, you’ll certainly be
hearing back from me!
– You don’t really need to put my name on the press
release. Personal touches are great, but I completely understand if you want to
reduce the odds of slipping up on the ol’ copy-paste and calling me Terry or
Steve or, God forbid, Natalie.
– If you’re sending releases and samples in the mail,
please don’t use a box big enough to fit a flat press release into when all
you’re mailing along is a tiny, tiny lipstick. Get a padded envelope. Get rid of
that fancy folder. Anything. I CAN HEAR TREES WEEPING.
Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear
about #wins.
Much of what I do is pretty on-the-fly, so when I send an
email frantically seeking high-res art or a product’s Canadian
availability/MSRP and the rep gets right back to me, I tell you, the angels
sing. I try not to assume that everyone’s at their desk ready to help me out
all of the time, but it’s absolutely marvelous when someone is prepared with
all the necessary info and materials and can get you out of a tight jam.
I hate?
Copy editor hours. Getting to wake up late is pretty
great, but I will unfortunately never be able to attend anyone’s awesome
late-afternoon event. Gotta build me a paper.
I love?
Polka dots, stripes, glittery stuff, Fender guitars with
matching headstocks, Blanche de Chambly, and my cat (who is himself striped).
Reading?
I still need to finish Grace Coddington’s autobiography,
which I was distracted from a couple weeks ago. The last one before that was
Who I Am by Pete Townshend. Next on deck is The Good Girls Revolt: How theWomen of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace by Lynn Povich.
Best place on earth?
Zingerman’s deli in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Dinner guest?
My dad, from whom I inherited all of my foodie
tendencies. I would bring my A and A+ games for that meal.
Hero?
Novelist/YouTuber John Green, Lena Dunham, Jenna Lyons,
and Electric Six lead singer Dick Valentine. And my mum. And Keith Moon.
Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these
days)?
I’m a bit of a beer nerd; lately I’ve been tracking all
the brews I sample through Untappd, which is a fun little social media app that
lets you rate and review beers, check in to wherever you drank them, and earn
badges, Foursquare-style. Thanks to the guys at C’est What for most of the stuff
on my “tried” list. I’ll see you tonight, probably.
Pool or ocean?
Ocean. You can actually sit and hang out by the ocean and
enjoy it without having to actually get in (something I would prefer to avoid).
Pools are significantly less fun to observe.
Voicemail or email?
Email, always.


image source: Natalia Manzocco
“The internet loves cats”

Media, Darling: Maggie Wrobel

Maggie started at the Globe and Mail in 2005 as a copy-editing intern
on the night News desk.

She was also part of the team that launched Globe Life (the
paper’s daily lifestyle section) in 2007. She worked as the production editor in the Style section for
five years before moving to her current position as assistant Arts
editor in the newly merged Life & Arts section in March of last year. In her current role she assigns and edits Arts stories both
short and long, with a particular eye to popular culture and music.

Image source: Maggie Wrobel

Twitter: @maggiewrobel

Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what
other careers were on the horizon?
In grade six, I wanted to work for the United Nations. By
the end of university, I was getting set to move to Africa and work for a
non-profit. But I’d always loved reading and writing, and spent several years
as a writer and editor at my university paper (UWO’s The Gazette).
 So, when I landed a summer copy-editing
internship at The Globe and Mail, I jumped on it. Eight years later, here I
still am.
Where would you like to be five years from now?
In the audience for Saturday Night Live‘s 43rd
anniversary special.
Any advice for people getting started in your industry?
Don’t pretend you know what someone is talking about when
you don’t. I don’t believe in ‘fake it till you make it.’ I think asking
questions is important – it shows you’re curious and willing to learn. I’d pick
genuine enthusiasm over bravado any day. That said: read. Read everything. And
then read some more.
What are your favourite media outlets, not including your
own? 
The New York Times and New York Magazine are both leaders
in our field and offer much inspiration, especially in the ways in which
they’ve embraced digital content.


Newseum.org is a must-visit every morning, offering PDFs
of front pages from all over the world, and always leads to much surfing.


And I admit it surprised me, but Twitter has a great
rhythm for daily news, both high and low-brow.
Best interview you’ve ever had? Worst?
I had a lovely interview last year with Laura and Kate
Mulleavy, the visionary sister act behind Rodarte. They were gracious,
interesting and genuinely down-to-earth.
As for bad interviews, they do happen, and for many
different reasons. But there’s always a way to make a story great. You just
have to find it.
Best advice you’ve ever been given?
When I was a young, eager up-and-comer, a colleague (now
friend) once told me she noticed I nodded a lot in meetings. I thought about
it, and she was right.
 I was trying to
seem encouraging and enthusiastic, but quickly realized that having a bit of a
poker face can actually be much more effective sometimes.
 Staying aware of your body sounds like a
silly thing, but the way you are perceived – even physically – can have a huge
effect on your career.
What rule(s) do you live your life by?
Always, always be kind. It can be hard to put yourself
into other people’s shoes, but it is essential to at least try.
What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?
Know who you’re pitching to and what they do. Read
mastheads, stay on top of Twitter and, if you still don’t know, ASK. You’d be
shocked how many people still think I’m the travel editor, a post I held for
less than two months more than four years ago. (For the record, the Globe’s
real travel editor is Domini Clark, who gives the world’s best advice on
everything from banking to, ahem, body language in meetings.)
Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear
about #wins.
Anyone who gets me what I need on deadline becomes that
day’s hero.
I hate?
Short-sightedness and pasta salad.
I love?
My job!
Also: the J. Crew catalogue, BarreWorks (the only
happy-making gym in the world), Moleskins, brunch and watching the tiny
inflatable Raptor bounce at Raptors games.
Reading?
Always.
Best place on earth?
A diner on Saturday with a stack of pancakes and a new
magazine.
Dinner guest?
J.D. Salinger! I’d probably nod a lot.
Hero?
I am lucky to have many. My mom is the strongest woman I
know and my dad the nicest man. My friend Lori Mastronardi is an amazing
wordsmith and has the incredible ability to always see the good in people and
situations. I also get a lot of strength and inspiration from hip-hop, be it
coming-up stories like Kendrick Lamar’s or the unapologetically upper-class
rhymes on Watch the Throne.
Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these
days)?
 I make a mean playlist. My day would not be the same
without Rdio for BlackBerry.
Pool or ocean?
Both, preferably within walking distance of each other.
Voicemail or email?
 Email. Or lunch.
Theatre show or cultural event you’re most looking
forward to this year?
The Arts & Crafts’ Field Trip has all the makings of a
killer time. Can’t wait. (Ed. note: we agree!)

Media Darling: Domini Clark

Domini Clark is the Travel Editor of
The Globe and Mail. She’s worked for the newspaper for 11 years, where she’s
worn many hats in news, arts and life, plus had a stint running the Style
section. Besides travelling the world (17 countries, all 10 provinces and 25 U.S. states and counting), her passions include
baking and boxing. She’s also more than a little obsessed with
J. Crew.

Twitter: @saradomini
Website: www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/

Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other
careers were on the horizon? 

I
always wanted to be a journalist – no dreams of being a teacher or vet like
many little girls. In grade three, my teacher had us write picture books and then
attend an event called the Young Author’s Conference, where we could choose
different speakers to listen to. I obviously attended the reporter’s lecture
and spoke to her afterward, because she signed my book, “Hope to see your
byline some day.” That pretty much sealed it. Then in Grade 11, as I struggled
through math class, I remember thinking, “Why am I here? I don’t need this
credit for journalism school.” I put down my pencil, grabbed my books and walked
out. (Of course, now whenever there are numbers in a story I’m so paranoid I do
the math about five times to make sure I have it right.)

Where
would you like to be five years from now?

I
just want to be happy and healthy. Life has thrown me too many curveballs to
pin my hopes on anything else.

Any
advice for people getting started in your industry?

Learn
how to tell a compelling story on myriad platforms: newspaper, video, social
media, radio, etc. The best journalists today are well rounded and comfortable
in several mediums. And when you get your first job, please, please don’t act
like you know everything. Confidence is great, and new ideas are always
welcome, but you are still going to have a lot to learn. I’m still learning.

What
are your favourite media outlets, not including your own? 

I’m
a magazine junkie – it’s an addiction I just can’t quit. Obviously Conde Nast Traveler would be at the top of that list. Other than that, I don’t have
outlets I check religiously. I’m always worried I’ll miss something, so I rely
mainly on my Google news feed and people posting interesting stories to Twitter
and Facebook. And I always tune into Friendly Fire on CFRB 1010. (My man is one
of the co-hosts, but it’s still good radio regardless.)

Best
interview you’ve ever had?

When
I had my first interview with The Globe and Mail, I assumed there was no way I
was getting the job. I was still in university and didn’t have a large
portfolio. So I went in figuring I had nothing to lose, and was my usual brash,
opinionated self. When the two interviewers (it was a total good cop/bad cop
setup) asked me to critique the paper, I dove right in. Whatever I said obviously
did the trick. I was offered the job the next day. Just goes to show you should
always be yourself.

Worst?
I
was a little too honest about my prospective co-workers once. (Okay, so maybe
being yourself doesn’t always pay off.) I was asked to interview again,
but this time to play nice. I ended up getting the job, but to this day I resent
having to go through that.

Best
advice you’ve ever been given?

Never
turn down a great opportunity. (Thanks, Dad.)

What
rule(s) do you live your life by?

Be
honest. Be yourself. Be informed. Treat others the way you want to be treated.
Oh, and don’t waste calories on grocery-store sheet cake at work parties.

What’s
the most important tip you can give PR pros?

Know
who/what you’re pitching to. Read the section and get a feel for the kinds of
stories we run. If you want to grab a coffee some time to chat and get a better
understanding, I’m happy to do that. That’s a better use of my time that
sifting through irrelevant e-mails. When I worked in the Style section I often
got cat food samples, which puzzled me to no end. Where was I supposed to run
cat food stories? Next to the runway shots?

Best
experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins.

When
I worked in the Style section, I’m sure PR folk saved my butt on more than one
occasion. Recently I was on a trip organized by Jared Rodriguez of Victoria King PR in New York. He put so much work into it and was such a dear, dealing
with all my requests and concerns. And then he had to hang out with a disparate
bunch of journos for a week. Some might say that’s one of the circles of hell.

I
hate?

People
who have loud cellphone conversations on the streetcar.

I
love?

Travelling.
Too obvious? How about, standing barefoot on the sheepskin rug I bought in New
Zealand. It’s simply the best feeling.

Reading?
The
Marriage Plot
 by Jeffrey Eugenides. I just want it to be over. I’m about
two-thirds of the way through and I can’t bring myself to finish it but I won’t
let myself start another book until I do. Why I am punishing myself I don’t
fully understand.

Best
place on earth?

That
is an unfair question to ask a travel editor! I am torn between Grenada and
Hawaii. I adore both. And they are both full of plumeria, which I love.
Whenever I smell that scent I’m transported to paradise.

Dinner
guest?

Victoria
Beckham. I suspect she is hilarious. And you know she has some crazy stories.
Plus, if we became friends maybe she’d give me clothing from her fashion line
for free.

Hero?
No
one person in particular. But I have the utmost respect and admiration for
people who have overcome adversity to make life better for themselves and/or
others.

Favourite
app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?

I
just downloaded a cool one called Pocketbooth (for iPhone) that lets you take
photobooth-strip-style pictures. It’s perfect for party season.

Pool
or ocean?

Ocean.
No contest.

Voicemail
or email?

Usually
email. But if it’s urgent, call me. I can’t promise I’ll pick up though, but
I’ll get the message.





Media, Darling: Gracie Carroll

Gracie Carroll is a blogger and freelance writer who covers lifestyle, culture, fashion, beauty and events. After completing the four year Fashion Communication program at Ryerson, she packed up and moved down to New York City to intern in the fashion department of Teen Vogue magazine


After six months in NYC, Gracie hopped across the pond to London. Following some PR work and online writing, the stars aligned and she met with the Executive Fashion Editor of ELLE UK for a fateful coffee which turned into a role at the magazine – assisting their fashion features director.

For the last few years she has been back in Toronto working on her blog, writing for ELLECanada.comPostCity.comFILLERmagazine and Plaid Magazine. Sometimes she throws parties and organizes events too, because she likes doing those sorts of things.
Twitter: @GracieCarroll

Did you
always want to be in the media? If not, what other careers were on the horizon?

I’ve always wanted to work in fashion. When I was a little
kid I hoped to be a supermodel, but as I got older that changed to wanting to
work for a magazine. Magazines always appealed to me because I thought they
were one great place where I could combine my love for fashion, photography,
writing and art direction. When I was a teenager I also tossed around the ideas
of being a lawyer, doctor, bartender and/or VJ.

Where would
you like to be five years from now?

I’m a Scorpio, and we’re very secretive, so I can’t tell you
that.

Any advice
for people getting started in your industry?

Work hard to get the internships you want, and work even
harder once you get them. The lessons you learn while interning, not to
mention the connections you can make, are often far more beneficial to you than
your education, or what school you went to. A lot of it comes down to who you
are, and who you know  – along with your talent, of course. Living and
working outside of Canada, not one person ever asked where I went to school. It
was about what I was bringing to the table.

What are
your favourite media outlets, not including your own? 

ELLE UK, Refinery29, Fashionista, Globe & Mail Style,
The Coveteur, ‘Thank You, OK‘. 

Best
interview you’ve ever had? Worst?

I fell in love with Giles Deacon when I interviewed him
last year. It was also fun to chat with Anna Dello Russo on the phone back in
London – I’ve still got her number in my iPhone contacts! 

Best advice
you’ve ever been given?

Believe in yourself (from a tarot card reader in Paris).

What rule(s)
do you live your life by?

Go for what you want in life. It’s up to you to make your
dreams come true. 

What’s the
most important tip you can give PR pros?

Don’t pitch stories or clients that make absolutely no
sense for the publication. It’s a waste of everyone’s time and will help you
lose credibility very quickly.  

Best
experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins.

It actually just happened in Calgary over the
weekend. I told a Calgary PR I wanted to visit a spa and a restaurant for lunch
before I flew out the next day. Within two hours she had me booked and
confirmed with a full itinerary and transportation sorted. Aside from answering
any questions I had, or solving any problems I’d created, she completely left
me alone to enjoy the experience – bliss.

I hate?

Bananas. 

I love?

The special people in my life that make it so much
richer. 

Reading?

ELLE UK‘s October Issue and Life by Keith Richards 

Best place
on earth?

My cottage, but I’m biased. 

Dinner
guest?

My best friend, Rachel. She’s been the best dinner
guest since grade four. 

Hero?

My mom. 

Favourite
app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?

Instagram, Rocket Man, UBER, and Epicurious. 

Pool or
ocean?

Infinity pool into the ocean. 

Voicemail or
email?

I hate both but email if I have to choose. 

Fashion week
show you’re most looking forward to?

Lucian Matis. 

Media, Darling: J. Kelly Nestruck

J. Kelly Nestruck is
the theatre critic at The Globe and Mail, and has been so since 2008. His
writings about the arts and theatre have also appeared in such publications
as the National Post, the Toronto Star, Toronto Life, The Boston Globe and The
Guardian
. He has appeared on
The National, been heard on CBC Radio’s Q, and tweets all the live-long day
@nestruck.

In addition to work, Nestruck is currently pursuing a Master’s from the Centre
for Theatre, Drama and Performance Studies at the University of Toronto. He
likes to garden, cycle around the city, and the J stands for James.

Photo credit: Catherine Farquharson.


Twitter: @Nestruck
Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other
careers were on the horizon?

No – when I was five, I wanted to be a firefighter. But from my teens on, my
twin passions were theatre and newspapers. The newspaper business seemed like
the wiser route financially at the time…


Where would you like to be five years from now?

I prefer to go where life takes me, but I’d be happy to still be here doing
what I’m doing now. It’d be nice have a kid to take to Young People’s Theatre.
Or at least a dog to take to Young Dogs’ Theatre.


Any advice for people getting started in your industry?

Have you considered the skilled trades?


What are your favourite media outlets, not including your own? 

Theatre-wise, I love to read all my competitors at the Toronto dailies and
weeklies, plus online voices such as Lynn Slotkin, Stage Door and the
Charlebois Post. Scott Brown in New York Magazine; Chris Jones at the Chicago
Tribune
; the whole theatre package in The Guardian. I subscribe to the NewYorker and The Onion, listen to This is That and Q on CBC Radio, and watch The
Bachelor
and Dragon’s Den. I read Garth Turner’s blog every day to get over my
renter inferiority complex.


Best interview you’ve ever had? Worst?

Best – playwright John Mighton in 2004. His pet rat Cookie escaped and I got to
watch him scramble around with his daughter to catch it.  Worst –
playwright Michael Frayn. I accidentally unplugged my computer with my foot
while interviewing him over the phone.


Best advice you’ve ever been given?

Don’t go to journalism school.


What rule(s) do you live your life by?

I do not have a body; I am a body.


What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?

Add your theatre openings to my online calendar: cantheatre.wikispaces.com.
I can’t keep track of emails any more.


Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins.

Ann Swerdfager at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival is a real delight to work
with – and I have to work with her a lot, so thank goodness!


I hate?

Stickers. They creep me out.


I love?

Seeing a show I loved find an audience.

Reading?
Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain


Best place on earth?

Mount Royal when the leaves turn.


Dinner guest?

Christopher Hitchens, RIP.


Hero?

Nick Auf Der Maur, RIP.


Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?

iAnnotate” is the reason I own an iPad.


Pool or ocean?

Ocean.


Voicemail or email?

Oh, email PLEASE.


Theatre show in the fall season you’re most looking forward to?

Alligator Pie at Soulpepper!

Media, Darling: Elio Iannacci

Elio Iannacci is an award-winning journalist and FASHION magazine’s Features Editor. He is also a regular contributor to Maclean’s
magazine and has had work published in
The Globe and Mail, National Post
and
The Toronto Star. As one of Canada’s most qualified and experienced fashion
and pop culture experts, he has had the opportunity to speak to some of the
world’s most fascinating people. 



Included in his list of interviews are iconic
names that range from Karl Lagerfeld to Lady Gaga, Beyoncé Knowles to Madonna
and Oscar-winner Kate Winslet, alongside acclaimed food author Nigella Lawson.
Elio has also been featured on a number of television shows, including
CNN
Showbiz Tonight,
MTV Canada, Much Music, ETalk and Entertainment Tonight.





Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other
careers were on the horizon?

Magazines, chap books, comic books and zines were my lifelines when I was
growing up. I was always fascinated by who put them together, who was covered
in them and how they were produced. I would have been a DJ, a librarian or a
costume archivist if I didn’t get into the writing/editing game.


Any advice for people getting started in your industry?

Act like a brand and people will treat you like a product. Spend more time reading than tweeting.


What are your favourite media outlets, not including your own? 

I read about three to five magazines a day (I have subscriptions to Vogue, Out, Entertainment
Weekly, The New Yorker, The Economist, The Advocate, Broken Pencil
and Interview)
and I typically keep a pound or two of poetry books, chap books, short story
collections and lit anthologies around me at all times. Online, I visit the
dailies and too many blogs to mention.


Best interviews you’ve ever had?

Sophia Loren, Karl Lagerfeld, David Sedaris, Lady Gaga, Annie Lennox, Eartha
Kitt, Patti Smith and Wayne Koestenbaum.


Worst?

Sean Combs. He answered his mobile during the whole interview and was too
distracted to answer any questions properly.


Best advice you’ve ever been given?

“You should always know when you’re shifting gears in life. You should leave
your era; it should never leave you.” c/o Leontyne Price.


What rule(s) do you live your life by?

Take vacations. Workaholics make the absolute worst writers and editors. The
best ideas are the ones you find while you are taking a couple days off and
living life outside of the office.


What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?

Read the magazine, website or newspaper you are trying to work with before you
send any emails or make any calls.


Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins.

TIFF seems to bring out the extra-crazy in everyone—especially during the end
of it. I will never forget how Debra Goldblatt was able to gracefully keep it
together, while juggling four films on the last day of the fest in 2009, and manage
to squeeze in two last-minute interviews for me without complaining.


I hate?
 
                      
All fifty shades of grey.


I love?

Fact checkers, librarians, artists, poets and anyone who is an advocate for the
arts.


Reading?

Personals, a book of poetry by Ian Williams. Lynn Crosbie’s gripping Life is
about losing everything. An anthology of short stories called New Stories From
The South
(edited by Amy Hempel).


Best place on earth?

Sardinia.


Dinner guests?

Maria Callas, Jackie Onassis, Roisin Murphy, Gareth Pugh, Grace Jones, Annie
Lennox, John Parot, Alfred Corn, Truman Capote and Hedi Slimane.


Heroes?

Langston Hughes, Frank O’Hara and Lou Grant.


Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?

QuickVoice — an app that records interviews and changed my life.


Pool or ocean?

Both. I swim a mean breast stroke.


Voicemail or email?

50/50. 

Media, Darling: Gabe Gonda

Gabe Gonda is the Globe and Mail‘s Arts editor. In his previous post at the Globe and Mail, he ran the Focus section. Before that, Gabe spent 12 years at the Toronto Star, where he worked on every desk as a copy editor, writing editorials, running the letters page, covering city hall, writing features, working as an assignment editor and running the Saturday Insight section for three years. Gabe went to the University of Toronto, where he played a year of varsity basketball, ran a student journal of political theory and dropped out to edit a campus newspaper called The Newspaper. That was before the Internets were a big deal.


Twitter: @GlobeArts

Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other careers were on the horizon?
When I was a kid I wanted to play for the Blue Jays, other than that I had no career plan.

Where would you like to be five years from now?
Buenos Aires.

Any advice for people getting started in your industry? 
Have a good luck charm.

What are your favourite media outlets, not including your own? 
The New Yorker, TMZ, ESPN.com, the London Review of Books.

Best interview you’ve ever had? Worst?
Lots of good ones. Worst was Jerry Stackhouse of the Detroit Pistons. He kept looking at me like I was birdshit on his shoe.

Best advice you’ve ever been given?
Be curious.


What rule(s) do you live your life by?
The Ten Commandments, at least that’s what I tell my rabbi.

What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?
Know something.

Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins.
The best PR work, like good refereeing or good editing, is invisible.

I hate?
Polenta.

I love?
Pizza.

Reading? 
Whenever I can.

Best place on earth?
At my dinner table, with my wife and two sons.

Dinner guest?
Anyone who asks strange questions, like my friend Ira.

Hero?
My grandfather. He owned a newspaper in Paris before World War II, but had to drop everything to save his family from the Nazis. He wrote for Hearst in Geneva and finished a Ph.D in history before starting over in America at the age of 42. Moved back to Paris in his 60’s and won a prize from the French academy for his book on the Treaty of Versailles a few weeks before dropping dead in 1982.

Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?
Happily app-less.

Pool or ocean?
Ocean.

Voicemail or email?
Text.