My ‘hood: Christina

By Christina
 
I live near Broadview subway station, which is right off the Danforth – home to some of the best restos in the city! There are many amazing places to nosh.

One of my favourites is 7 numbers. This spot is great for a cheap, big, authentic Italian meal. My fiance and I consider ourselves calamari connoisseurs, and this restaurant passes with flying colors!

The restaurant is charmingly loud, with eclectic furniture, paper table cloths and an enormous chalk-board menu. A tip for dining here: when ordering wine, be sure to ask for a wine glass or your Merlot will be delivered in a plastic cup!

The Danforth is also a great place to shop. Enter Tabula Rasa (745 Broadview Ave), my new favourite store, located steps away from my house (dangerous!).

The owner, Jennifer Park, is amazing at helping me select a new look from their wide selection of new (like Wayne Clark and Ports), vintage and reconstructed vintage pieces.

Here is a photo of  our client Noah Reid (Score: A Hockey Musical) and me in a last-minute purchase from Tabula Rasa. Score!

The D-forth is also home to the Carrot Common, a hybrid grocery store that sells health food, flowers, minerals, gourmet coffee and organic juice, massage products, books, plants, unique clothing and much more…

They also sell freshly squeezed juice and smoothies. Great place to stop by post-run for some hydration!

There you have it – the Danforth is a lot more than just Greektown. Come check out some of these hot spots. Maybe you’ll discover something new while you’re strolling around the east end.

TIFF ’10: Meet Our Client: Noah Reid

You’ll soon see Noah Reid lacing up his skates in TIFF’s opening night film, Score! A Hockey Musical. Plus, he just scored the lead in a Syfy pilot on Fox called Three Inches, an action-adventure/fantasy with a superhero twist.

An actor since the age of eight, Reid has lent his voice to many animated series, including Franklin the Turtle, Jane and the Dragon and Pippi Longstocking. He also starred in various small screen roles, including Strange Days at Blake Holsey High, Terry, Degrassi: The Next Generation, Soul Food and In Love and War.

Reid holds impressive theatre credits, including roles at the world-renowned Stratford Shakespeare Festival, Soulpepper Theatre, Blyth Festival and Theatre Aquarius. He was a recipient of the prestigious John Hirsch Award (2009), which is given to the most promising actor in the Stratford Festival.

Reid attended Etobicoke School of the Arts (Toronto), and is a graduate of the prestigious National Theatre School of Canada (Montreal). He currently lives in Toronto and is a client of Gary Goddard Agency. He is managed by DF Management in LA and NYC.

What do you do? 
I’m an actor. And a semi-musician. 
How long have you worked with rock-it promotions?
We started working together in June 2010, to gear up for the release of my film Score: A Hockey Musical. [Ed. note: In select Canadian theatres beginning October 22].
 
What do you love most about your job?
I get to wear other people’s lives and see what it’s like to be them. I can leave whatever else is going on in my life at the door, and literally walk in someone else’s shoes. I mean, I started acting when I was about six years old, professionally when I was eight, and I had never had so much fun. Everyone involved seemed so cool and funny, and had great stories.
I got to say and do stuff I would never say or do as a normal kid, and audiences would laugh and applaud, and it all seemed like organized goofing around to me. I guess it’s never really changed. 
Now, I can also appreciate that I get to learn from the different walks of life that my characters come from. Actors end up with a grab bag of (often useless) skills and knowledge from playing the roles they play in their careers, and I think there’s something really cool about that.
 
What do you like the least about your profession/industry?

I find it tough to deal with the business side of things. It’s all fun and games when you’re acting, but there’s a real edge to the industry as well, and I find I am always reminded that it is a business where business decisions are made. 
The classic example is the audition process, and the rejection that goes hand in hand with it. Actors always have to remind themselves not to take it personally, which is hard when our work is so deeply personal. Actors are also friends with other actors, and sometimes a part can come between a friendship. But, I think you learn to deal with that pretty quickly. 

Personally, I would be thrilled to just learn my lines, show up and have a good time, but there’s a game within the game.

What’s your next big goal?
I’d like to get to a point where I have more control over the projects I’m doing. I mean, I’ve never said yes to a project I didn’t want to do, but that’s different from choosing roles and projects and colleagues. It’s probably a ways down the road, but for me the goal is a little bit of creative control.
Why is PR important to you (and what you do professionally)?
I mentioned the “business” side of the business; the “game within the game”. Well, these are areas that are important in getting ahead, and they’re areas I can use help with. 
I am terrible at self-promotion. I want people to know who I am and to think of me for interesting and challenging roles, and if my name and face keep popping up in the right place at the right time, then maybe I’m a little closer to that. But, if I were in charge of making sure that happened all on my own, I’d probably want to shoot myself.

Any other thoughts you want to share about your public relations experience?
It’s really nice to not be stressed out about this side of my work, and to know that there are some very capable people behind me. 

A little more from the fourth floor:
Website tsn.ca.
Designer Hugo Boss.
Store – A music store called Paul’s Boutique, in Kensington Market.
Book – Anything by Hunter S. Thompson, Charles Bukowski, Martin McDonagh or William Shakespeare.
Snack – Anything with salt and grease.
Season – Winter.
Sexy – Definitely.
Inspiration – Irish playwrights, Tom Waits and Bob Dylan, women, older actors.
Drink – Guiness.
Motto in two words – Have fun.
Idea of perfect happiness – Going to the cottage with my lady for a week after working on something really challenging and meaningful.
Indulgence – Which one?
Greatest achievement – Continuing to do what I love.