Fashion-able: #WMCFW Day 2

We’re excited to welcome Bianca Teixeira to the fourth floor. She used to work on the third floor below us, and we’ve missed running into her in the hallways! 

Bianca Teixeira (@BeeLauraTee) is a
writer in Toronto. Her words have appeared in Sharp Magazine, Huffington Post,
Toronto Standard, FashionMagazine.com, Fashion Television, The Kit,
Fashionotes and more. She writes mostly about style, beauty, entertainment,
fitness, television recaps and media.


Six Things That Caught My Eye: WMCFW Day 2
Klaxon Howl’s Cropped Peacoats
I absolutely love watching menswear shows but can never stop myself from thinking ‘who would actually wear that?’. Designer Matt Robinson took ideas from the past and turned them into still wearable pieces. The cropped peacoat in particular really caught my eye (paired with a newspaper cap, naturally) because it reminds me of something Gene Kelly would have worn. Totally swoon worthy.

Laura Siegel’s Dramatic Make Up
The glorious fall shades that showed up intricately draped over Laura Siegel’s models didn’t stop at the neckline. I absolutely loved the deep berry shade on the models lips. Combined with warm golds on the eyelids, the lips popped right out of the face and had me jonesing for a quick stop into a makeup store to copy the entire look.

David Dixon’s Blazer Cape Hybrids
Dixon’s show was all about girl power from the opening video that remarked that the notion of women keeping silent is bullshit, to the thumping female anthems mixed in with quotes about feminism. The clothes too gave off serious power-suited-femme vibes. While it was hard to choose just one thing from this runway that caught my eye (feathered collars? Sequined sleeves?) the capes that resembled blazers from the back were absolutely incredible.

DUY’s Fur Sleeves
Thanks to winter’s last hurrah, anything with fur definitely made me yearn. One jacket in particular during DUY’s show actually had me extending my arms hoping to swathe myself in it: a powder blue leather jacket with a sumptuous fur collar and sleeves.

All of Line’s Outerwear
No one does outerwear like Line and no one makes me wish for cold weather EXCEPT the designers behind Line. From the textured leather jackets to the oh-so-cozy knits, my seatmate and I couldn’t help but whisper ‘want that, and that, and that’ after every model walked down the catwalk. As much as I loathe being cold, I would gladly face another six months of winter for the chance to rock a layered belted Line sweater. 


Sid Neigum Hair

As someone who can barely straighten their hair without causing serious injury to myself and others, Neigum’s skyscraping hair was all I could focus on! 




*All photos courtesy of World MasterCard Fashion Week and George Pimentel

Media Darling: Greg Hudson

Born and raised in Edmonton, AB, where he made his mother
proud by singing and acting in many high school musicals, Greg Hudson is now
the associate editor of
Sharp, Canada’s men’s magazine. He talks to starlets and
authors, and is the one you would pitch to if you want a story in the
magazine. He’s also written for Toronto Life, Elle Canada
and
Canadian Business. He has a wife and an incredibly cute dog named
Saunders



Website: sharpformen.com
Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other
careers were on the horizon? 
I always wanted to be in the media, but in high school that
meant being a subject of media. I wanted to be the first Canadian prime
minister who got his start as a world-renowned pop star. My heroes were Pierre
Trudeau and Robbie Williams.

Where would you like to be five years from now?
A place where I can look back and say, “You know, I am now in
a completely appropriate place career-wise vis-a-vis where I was five years
ago. I am therefore content.” I will say this from a bigger apartment.

Any advice for people getting started in your industry?
Work hard. Editors—and hopefully readers, too—can tell when
you phone something in.

What are your favourite media outlets, not including your
own? 
Of course, all the other men’s magazines, but also: Slate.com, TheAtlanticWire.com (I have a crush on Richard Lawson. You can tell
him I said that.), The A.V. Club.

These are shocking, considering my demographic.  

Best interview you’ve ever had?
Brooklyn Decker was surprisingly candid, when she really
didn’t have to be. George Saunders and Michael Chabon were dreams that came
true.

Worst?
Probably Amber Heard. She didn’t walk out or anything, she was
just too pretty to be at all enthused.

Best advice you’ve ever been given?
I think I’ve forgotten all the advice I’ve ever been given.

What rule(s) do you live your life by?
I try to treat others as though they are, in fact, real
humans. Although, I probably fall short of the Golden Rule more often than I
allow myself to admit.

What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?
If something is personalized to me, and backed up by a sense
that they know my publication, I’m going to look for ways to help them.

Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear
about #wins.
When I feel like I’ve made an honest connection with a PR
person, whether it’s through hilarious email banter, or the reciprocated use of
ironic exclamation marks, it’s a win. Oh, and when people can hook me up with
books, gift ideas, or samples at the last minute for silly television
appearances? To them, I silently sing Bette Midler’s Wind Beneath My Wings.

I hate?
The word natch. I hate the word natch.

I love?
Validation.

Reading?
Everyone’s life would be improved by reading George
Saunders’ new book The Tenth of December. (I named my dog after the guy. He’s
like my new Pierre Trudeau and Robbie Williams).

Best place on earth?
Shuswap Lake in British Colombia. 


Dinner guest?
Ugh. I have to make dinner now? No. No.

Hero?
See answer above, under READING.

Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?
These are all words I don’t understand. Like favourite appetizer? I’m a fan of
various dips, I think. Or, you know, a plate of wings. Pan bread and parm dip
at Earl’s is pretty great, too.

Pool or ocean?
Neither. Lake. But, you know, a clean one.

Voicemail or email?

Email. 





Media, Darling: Peter Saltsman

Peter Saltsman is an
Associate Editor at Toronto Life, where he handles the magazine’s
Navigator section—the one that’s about real estate and stuff. Before that he
worked as a copy editor in the Arts & Life section at the National Post.
His work has also appeared in Sharp Magazine and Torontoist

  
 

Twitter: @toronto_life


Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other careers were on the
horizon?


For a while I thought I wanted to be an architect. Turns out I have the glasses
for it, but not the spatial sense. And I wouldn’t be a very good magazine
editor if I didn’t also have a couple of unfinished screenplays on my computer.


Where would you like to be five years from now?


Anywhere that’s not law school.


Any advice for people getting started in your industry?


Play the game. Intern. Look busy. Beg for work. And, ideally, be good at what
you do.


What are your favourite media outlets, not including your own? (i.e.: what do
you read/listen/watch?)

New York Magazine. Grantland. WTF with Marc Maron.


Best interview you’ve ever had?

Dolph Lundgren. He’s impressive, physically and intellectually. And I’d never
been to the Thompson Rooftop before, so that was fun.


Worst?


The keyboardist from Bon Jovi. I didn’t know his name when we talked and I
still don’t. But since then I’ve always prepared for interviews.


Best advice you’ve ever been given?


“It’s a newspaper—people are just going to throw it out the next day anyway.”


What rule(s) do you live your life by?


A good story, both in life and in print, is worth almost any amount of personal
humiliation.


 


What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?


Editors really need your help. So trust us: we’ll let you know when a pitch
works.


 


Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins.


That time someone sent me a free sweater. But really, there are lots of awesome
PR people in this city. It’s great when the people you’re working with are
smart and interested and are willing to drop the pitch for a minute to find out
what I actually need.


 


I hate?


Earnestness.


 


I love?


Coffee.


Reading?

Independence Day by Richard Ford.


Best place on earth?


The Dairy Queen on Broadview at Pottery Road.


Dinner guest?


Anyone who’s buying. And maybe
Pat Tabler and Buck Martinez.

Hero?


David Letterman.


 


Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?


Rocket Radar. So I know exactly how late I’m about to be.  


Pool or ocean?


Neither. But if pressed, ocean.


Voicemail or email?

Email. Though if it’s a lonely afternoon in the office and I’m starved for
human contact, I’ll probably answer my phone. 

Media, Darling: Fraser Abe

Fraser Abe is a freelance lifestyle and entertainment writer based in Toronto. He’s mainly known for his work with Toronto Life, but his writing has also appeared in The Grid, the Toronto Standard and SharpForMen.com. In his downtime he enjoys being a misanthropic curmudgeon yelling at kids to get off his lawn.

Twitter: @fraserabe
Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other careers were on the horizon?
No, I worked on Bay Street doing Bay Street-y things. After I decided the only thing I liked about the business was after-work drinks on Thursdays at the various patios (including many a mis-spent evening at Vertical), getting laid off was the push I needed to apply for an internship at Toronto Life. That was in 2009 and I haven’t looked back since. Except, you know, when I realize it takes money to do things.
Where would you like to be five years from now?
I’d love to be living in New York and writing for GQ or Esquire or something, but I think if I re-read this in five years and I’m still in Toronto I’ll be depressed, so let’s just say still here, but making decidedly more money.
Any advice for people getting started in your industry?
Unpaid internships get a lot of flack, but I think they’re the best way to learn and to meet people in the business. My writing was pretty rambling and incoherent when I wrote for She Does The City (I wrote a sort-of gay sex column called Homo Arigato Mr Roboto) and my internship really helped me polish my work. It’s also really great to know how to fact-check and what goes into making a magazine, even if you want to work online or, I’d guess, in PR. Also, check your expectations. This job isn’t even close to glamourous. Find a rich husband (I’m still looking, fellas) if you want glamour or Balenciaga tote bags.
What are your favourite media outlets, not including your own?
This is a tough question for freelancers, since I’ve written for Toronto Life, The GridSharp and the Toronto Standard (all amazing outlets, of course). But I like Gawker (they’re snarkier than I could ever actually be in print – though I probably come close in real life), the AV Club and anyone else who would like to pay me to write for them. My new favourite magazine right now is Wired – they do great stories with fun charticles like “What’s In Pop Rocks”.
Best interview you’ve ever had?
I don’t do a lot of proper interviews, but during TIFF I talk to celebrities for nanoseconds. This year I peed with Gerard Butler. I also had a great time chatting with Aaron Levine and Michael Williams from A Continuous Lean for the Toronto Standard when they came to Toronto for the relaunch of the Club Monaco on Bloor.
Worst?
If only I had interesting stories to impart. I’d just say generally when people give one word answers it makes writing something pithy pretty difficult.
Best advice you’ve ever been given?
I think Carley Fortune (torontolife.com associate editor when I was interning) was a really great mentor, despite us being the same age, and she really helped my writing. I used to submit 500 word posts, but now my work is a lot more succinct. I’ve also got to give thanks to Matthew Fox (torontolife.com‘s editor) for giving me a chance to cover TIFF my first year, when he’d only seen me write for one other outlet. Jen McNeely from SDTC, who I met as a summer student a thousand years ago, gave me my first writing gig and introduced me to Matthew. And if you’ve never worked with Veronica Maddocks, try to. She is the most thorough researcher I’ve ever had the pleasure of working with and an amazing teacher.
What rule(s) do you live your life by?
Oh, I don’t know. Who has their own personal mantra they repeat in front of the mirror every morning? I guess just be nice to the people who serve you food and drive you places.
What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?
Learn people’s names. Everyone on Twitter seems to hate that and I can’t even count how many people think my first name is Abe. Follow up with a personalized email if you (for some strange reason) actually want me somewhere or want me to pitch a story to some outlet. It’s hard to care when your email is so obviously a form letter (unless you’re sending emails about free wings – keep those coming).
Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins. 
All of my best experiences with PR people have been because they’ve taken the time to try and know me and know what I actually write about. A less formal approach is always appreciated, I like when we can joke about other stuff while still getting work done. I also am always appreciative of PR people who realize most of us don’t have time to respond to every email we get.
I hate?
Lots and lots and lots of things. Read my Twitter, I’ve probably written about something that irked me within the last 24 hours.
I love?
Walks on the beach, dinner by candlelight, macarons with my New York Times Sunday crossword and a Starbucks Venti half-caf moccachino, being facetious.
Reading?
I just came back from a vacation where I read American Pastoral by Philip Roth (Dawn Dwyer reminded me so much of Betty Draper I feel like Matthew Weiner must have stolen her from Roth) and Bossypants by Tina Fey. Right now I’m reading Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem. And I love to read this little indie drawn art series about these kooky teenagers from a fictitious town called Riverdale.
Best place on earth?
Well I just returned from Turks and Caicos, where I ate lobster and swam in turquoise water every day so let’s say there. And of course I love Saturdays at Fly. Look for me next time you’re there, I’m the one with his shirt off drinking Rev.

Dinner guest?

Ina Garten, but she has to cook us a roast chicken and bring her cadre of fabulous gays.
Hero?
Gambit from the X-Men. Maybe Wolverine.
Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?
Instagram is fun, but let’s be real. Scruff.
Pool or ocean?
Pool, provided there are no screaming children.
Voicemail or email?
The only person that leaves me voicemails is my dad. And Kevin Naulls (but he prefers to be called Big Kev), when he tells me “we need to talk about last night”. He tricks me every time – I guess I should stop getting black-out drunk.

Media, Darling: Kevin Naulls

Kevin Naulls attended the school of hard knocks at the University of Toronto (St. George Campus), where he studied English, History and Philosophy. His humble beginnings started with an internship with designer Pat McDonagh (which he did simultaneously with a night job at Sun Media), and sneaking into shows at “the tents.” Around that time, he began writing a blog that would eventually deal almost exclusively with contemporary menswear and dudes with beards named Dressed for Dinner, which led to more pictures of bearded men on the Internet.

After writing for Sharp, The Sharp Book for Men, Eye Weekly, the Toronto Sun, The Block, and more, and still working nights at Sun Media, he was offered a job as Associate Online Editor at Toronto Life, where he lives and breathes today (and sometimes allows him to sleep at a reasonable hour). He very much enjoys it. 


Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other careers were on the horizon? 
Like any idealistic young lad, I wanted to be a cartoonist, an actor, a lawyer, a criminologist and a philosopher. I gave up on those dreams long ago, but I still aspire to be a television comedy writer, and I’m writing spec scripts on the side. No, you can’t read them (not yet anyway).

Where would you like to be five years from now?
In five years? Well, I like the experience of working at Toronto Life – I am allowed to have a voice that is my own, and I’m learning new skills every day that I wouldn’t have (at least not as quickly) as a freelancer.  But I’d love to be the next Mindy Kaling, because I like fashion shows, fashion shows at lunch.

Any advice for people getting started in your industry?
I didn’t sleep before I got my job at Toronto Life. I ran my blog, worked nights and freelanced for multiple publications. I don’t want to recommend an unhealthy lifestyle, but everyone wants these jobs, and having a take-on-all-comers attitude is a clear sign to employers that you’re willing to push yourself to your limits. And stories don’t just fall into your lap every day, so it is important to get into the habit of fighting for a scoop.

What are your favourite media outlets, not including your own? 
What I read: Fantastic Man, V magazine, Interview, the New York Times, New York magazine, The Gentlewoman, Corduroy, The Awl, Gawker, Workwear magazine (when I can find it (send it to me! Or find me .PDFs!))

What I listen to: to ensure a person’s sexual issues are much more complicated than mine, I listen to the Savage Love podcast. To laugh out loud, I listen to Julie Klausner’s podcast How Was Your Week (I like to pretend she’s my girlfriend when I’m listening). I hate Slate’s Culture Gabfest—if I wanted to listen to lukewarm talk radio that is basically a roundtable of people with convoluted ideas about pop culture, I’d go to Trampoline Hall.

Best advice you’ve ever been given?
“Talk is cheap, motherfucker.” – DMX

DMX may not have said it to me personally, but it resonated. I have no patience for people who do not speak for themselves in a critical way. I work in an industry where the emphasis is on brand building, and I refuse to pretend to care about something for free drinks and VIP experiences. 

Everything should be broken down, illustrating positives and negatives, because no one will learn anything otherwise – you’d tell your children that some things are right, and some things are wrong, and while “right” and “wrong” are subjective, I’d rather someone speak openly and be slightly wrong than lie down and take it, spilling adjectives onto a page that do not rightly reflect the subject. 


What rule(s) do you live your life by?
A couple of good friends once said “there are no rules on girls weekend,” and I tend to live my life that way. I’m not a cat though, so it isn’t all fancy free – I am professional, and stick to deadlines, even when I’m writing jokey captions or living in sewers.  I promise to always love the people I love, even when they sing karaoke better than I do. And like Maestro, I always stick to my vision.

Best interview you’ve ever had?
I had the opportunity to interview Robert Geller, and what could have been a 15 minute interview turned into an hour and 15 minutes. Most of the time subjects are so media trained that they become resistant—there’s this wall that they hit, as if someone is tapping them on the shoulder (sometimes there is someone) telling them it is time to wrap it up. We chatted like old school chums, and his level of candidness helped me with my story immensely. I like when people aren’t in a rush. If it is going to be a media circus, it almost isn’t worth it. I don’t have 2 minute interviews and I feel as if no one really should.

Oh, and obviously chatting with Felicity Jones during TIFF. That was unforgettable, and I thank Alex Thompson from Joe Fresh for making that happen. It might mean nothing to everyone else, but I was a huge Worst Witch fan and we gabbed about it briefly, which made my night. I’m willing to fight for a story, but it is nice when meetings happen so easily, and the other party (celebrity or otherwise) is actually really nice about having a chat.

Worst interview you’ve ever had?
Interviewing Alicia Silverstone during TIFF. It lasted all of 30 seconds, and 20 seconds of it was her trying to sell me her book. It was incredibly disappointing to say the least.

What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?
I love PR girls when they relax. So many are high strung, sporting impeccably bleached teeth and a perma-smile. Girls (and guys), I know it is your job to rep your clients (I know). Get off your game once in a while and have a bit of fun with the media you’re working with. Some of my best PR-media relationships are with those who know when to be professional, and know when it is cool to let loose a little bit. 

Also, this is such a small matter because I know a lower case ‘i’ can look like an ‘l’, but my last name is NAULLS, not NAULIS. And I am a Mr., not a Ms. (which, again, usually just makes me laugh). My biggest pet peeve though is when someone follows up on an email the day of sending it. Yes, your email is the most urgent email I’ve received all day.


Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins
My favourite PR person in the world is Steve Sane from Sane PR in the UK, but that has a lot to do with who he represents and how awesome everything is—not to mention his entire staff must work around the clock, because every single time I’ve asked for photos or information, it gets to me in mere moments. I’ve waited days in Toronto. The girls and guys in Toronto know who they are, because they continue to make my life easier by getting things to me on time, and not harassing me by phone. Not everything a PR person represents fits in at Toronto Life, and I’m sorry your job requires you to pitch me toilets, but please learn that I do what I can with what is given—sometimes a turd is just a turd (to be crass).

I hate?
Everything. But really, I don’t care for people who insert French words into sentences because they’ve been to Paris once (or twenty times). I find that I read this a lot in fashion journalism, but a good editor will strike that out and recast it using the English word (or equivalent). I hate walking to the streetcar on a cold damp day, and I hate when I forget to pack my lunch in the morning. I also don’t like when people talk about their jobs all the time, but in this industry, there is so much one-upmanship, that someone is always doing something fabulous (well, guess what, sometimes I eat dinner in my underwear while I watch television on my laptop).

I love?
Brassy women and hilarious men (my friends), beards (hilarious beardos go to the top of the class), meta-jokes, plaid shirts, Happy Socks, Mark McNairy shoes, fried spaghetti sandwiches, Cruel Intentions, Home Movies (cartoon series), Archer, American Dad, Life and Times of Tim, ice water, dark denim, scotch on the rocks, a good IPA, 13 Going on 30 and Aaron Spelling, 

Reading?
I bet you think I’m reading Jonathan Franzen, but I’m not. I’m re-reading Tyler’s Cape by Darren Greer in hopes that my book club Literection (this is real) will re-emerge.

Best place on earth?
Any hotel with a gigantic king-size bed, and a mattress you can just sink in enough (while still being firm). The important part of this scenario is that I have zero obligations while I am there, so I can come and go as I please. This one time I was in New York, my phone died on the first night and I forgot my charger, and it was the best trip ever.

Dinner guest?
Dead: River Phoenix; alive: Brenda Strong.
These require no explanation.

Hero?
Other than Cara Pifko, Tina Fey? Is this as obvious as Rory writing an entrance-to-Harvard essay on Hilary Clinton? Because I don’t care. She has the best comic timing, and everything she does is relatable, no matter who you are or what circle of friends you claim to be part of. I’d also have dinner with her, but with Tina Fey we’d also drink bourbon and shoot pellet guns at stop signs.  

Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?
I was playing Words With Friends pretty regularly with my colleague Fraser Abe (but we are both pretty good and just started to annoy each other—we kept the games going for a long time by only placing two letter words). Now I play Family Feud and Friends and Instagram pictures of my shoes and socks.

Pool or ocean?
Give me a lap pool to myself and I’m a kid in a candy store. I love just swimming and swimming without people bothering me (or fish, or sharks, or octopi). But really, I’ll swim anywhere, especially at night.

Voicemail or email? 
Always email me, unless the matter is urgent (or be like me and annoy your friends by leaving not-so-urgent messages on a Saturday afternoon). But seriously, I prefer emails unless we’re close enough to have each others phone number for not-work shenanigans.