Stage Write: David Mamet’s RACE at Canadian Stage

We just love going to the the-a-tah. Last night, we were thrilled to attend the buzziest opening night of the 2013 season, the much-anticipated Canadian
Stage
production of RACE. In fact, we loved it so much, you should probably stop reading this and go book your tickets now (pro-tip: check out Canadian Stage’s Facebook ticketing app to score $10 day-of rush tickets between 10 a.m. and noon). Seriously. It was intense, controversial, very well-acted and the 90 minute production flew by.

A new Canadian production featuring some of this country’s top talent (*cough* Jason
Priestley
*cough*) take the stage in this provocative drama written by David Mamet (who you may know as the outspoken and award-winning playwright who wrote classics like Glengarry Glen Ross and Oleanna, or as the father of Girls star Zosia Mamet).


Brandon Walsh goes from sweet to gritty. We like.
Image courtesy of Canadian Stage.*

Sharply written with wit and incendiary dialogue, Mamet
crafts a social commentary on race relations, prejudices and gender politics. The play
is bound to spark plenty of debate, as well-off white guy Charles Strickland (Matthew Edison) embarks on a legal
battle
after being accused
of raping a young black woman.



The cast feeling some tension in RACE.
Image courtesy of Canadian Stage*



The one act play takes place in the office of cut-throat interracial legal team Jack Lawson (played by Priestley), Henry Brown (Nigel Shawn Williams) and legal associate Susan (Cara Ricketts), as they find themselves the attorneys of record on a controversial case that no other lawyer in town will touch with a ten-foot pole. As the case unfolds, it exposes much more than a vicious crime. 

Jason Priestley and Nigel Shawn Williams command 
the stage as legal duo Jack and Henry.
Image courtesy of Canadian Stage*

The dialogue-driven drama delivers heavy subject matter (with some quite spicy language) in a way that is thought-provoking and challenging without being intimidating. The incredibly talented cast knock it out of the park under the guidance of director Daniel Brooks
Don’t miss RACE at the Bluma Appel Theatre until May 5.
Image courtesy of Canadian Stage*
One of the best moments from opening night happened after the show – you may have heard about a recent episode of How I Met Your Mother on which Priestley appeared as a guest star. In the episode, he fantasized about a strawberry jelly doughnut stuffed with a chocolate Timbit as his dream doughnut. The restaurant responded in a savvy way by tweeting a photo of a mock-up doughnut they created. A win, all around. 
As a surprise for Priestley last night, Canadian Stage got a few The Priestleys made and presented to them to the visibly surprised star of the show. He took a bite and pronounced it delicious. A sweet surprise to cap off an amazing evening!
Tickets for the show start at $22, and will be on stage now until Sunday, May 5 at the Bluma Appel Theatre. 

*Production photos by David Hou. Set design by Debra Hanson.

Media, Darling: Angie Smith

Angie Smith joined the daytime talk show The Marilyn Denis Show in the summer of 2012 as a senior segment producer and on-air fashion expert.


Five years leading up to her current post, Smith reported on high profile events for Entertainment Tonight Canada including the Grammys, the Oscars and international Fashion Weeks. She’s chatted with numerous fashion icons like photographer Ellen Von Unwerth, Oscar de La Renta, Kenneth Cole, Sarah Jessica Parker, Essie Weingarten, Ivanka Trump, Jenna Lyons, Nicole Richie, Kim Kardashian, Heidi Klum and [one of her personal favorites] media mogul Barbara Walters. Smith’s talent reaches beyond celebrity-style with a primary focus on consumer awareness. In 2011, she was featured on Livedress.com about body-types and swimwear. In 2007, she produced a mini-series on the hidden health issue of “skinny-fat” for ET Canada and a two-part series on a model who survived a brain hemorrhage. 

Most recently, she hosted an evening of discussions at America’s Next Top Model Live in Toronto. Smith also partnered with GAP Canada to give shopping tips as part of a cross-province shopping event. One of the best parts of my job is the story-telling,” says Smith. “I also love a good transformation – knowing that someone walks away feeling educated from a story I put together, or that they feel better about themselves in some way.”

Prior to her start in lifestyle journalism, Smith interned at 48 Hours Investigates in New York City. She graduated with a Master’s Degree in Journalism and an Honours degree in Media, Information and Technoculture from The University of Western Ontario as well as an Ontario Certificate in Writing.

Website: www.marilyn.ca

Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other careers were on the horizon? 
I blame my grandparents for my career choice. When I was very young they got me a subscription to National Geographic and I was hooked on the concept of ‘journalism.’ I started interviewing my family, and anyone that came to the house, using a microphone and tape recorder. In university I did consider law – consider being the key word. And now after working in the media and realizing our pay scale, I’ve contemplated stripping…

Where would you like to be five years from now?
In a house with a lot of cats. 

Any advice for people getting started in your industry?
Don’t shy away from internships.  We’ve all been there (I started as a script runner for Breakfast Television) and they get that foot in the door to show ‘em what you’ve got.

What are your favourite media outlets, not including your own? 
Dateline NBC, 48 Hours Investigates, HGTV, National Geographic and The Bachelor/Bachelorette.

Best interview you’ve ever had?
Katy Perry. Hands down.

Worst?
Marisa Tomei. Hands down.

Best advice you’ve ever been given?
“If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.” ― Dalai Lama XIVThe Art of Happiness
And, “you’ll get over it.”  You can really get over anything by changing your state of mind.

What rule(s) do you live your life by?
I don’t have specific rules, but I read The Art of Happiness quite often. I can now flip to specific chapters when certain situations arise. It’s a game changer. But my goal is always happiness and learning/understanding others.  

What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?
Never hesitate with sending pitches – they will likely end up in the right hands one way or another. But try to make sure you know your audience (who is reading the pitch).

Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins.
One PR* pro I know quite well stepped in to ‘model’ in one of my ET Canada segments to ensure the best brand/client representation – it showed real heart and dedication to her role.  I held on to her name/card for years knowing that no matter where she went she would be an extremely reliable contact. *Now a member of rock-it promotions, actually.

I’ve also experienced PR companies sending over props and clothing last minute to help make the best TV segment possible. I’m at the point where I can rely on specific agencies (like rock-it) to go above and beyond in ensuring all areas of a segment come together perfectly – even if it’s not all entirely related to their client.

I hate?
Mushrooms and the idea of veal.

I love?
My husband, cats, poutine, my MDS family and cheese.

Reading?
Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and my Harrowing Escape by Jenna Miscavige Hill.

Best place on earth?
Ordering line at a chip truck OR anywhere else with my husband Rick and family – road trips, the lake house…the list could go on and on.

Dinner guest?
Anthony Robbins – is he really that tall?

Hero?
My mother (cliché but true in this case).

Favourite app (or whatever you are downloading these days)?
I prefer online shopping. I’m obsessed with gilt.com, zara.com/hicanada, and beyondtherack.ca

Pool or ocean?
Ocean. Unless the pool is mine all mine.

Voicemail or email?
Email. I never check my voicemails…to the point where they time out and delete themselves before I even know they existed.

DIY: Cut-out tee’s

It’s been awhile since we did a DIY post, and we were itching to get crafty again. After some poking around the Internet (seriously, what did people do before the Internet?) and a timely post from UrbaneBloc.com, we came across some cool cut-out t-shirts that we thought could be pretty easy to try our hand at. 


Some of our inspiration: 

Here’s what you need: 

– An oversized, slouchy t-shirt. Fitted will just look trashy here, not “I’m Coachella-ready”. Pick your colour! We chose tees from Joe Fresh for their punchy colours and solid value. *Protip: learn from our mistakes and pick a solid cotton shirt. The blends feel too flimsy after they’re cut.
– Sharp scissors with pointy tips. 
– Soft pencil or marker if you’re desperate (but a soft pencil works much better).
– Ruler.

We tried two different ideas, one more difficult than the other. There are tons more out there, so try these, then see what else inspires you.
DIY #1: Show Your Ribs
We loved the design of this one, reminiscent of a spine and ribs exposed down the back. Plus, we found a template online from the eternally-handy DIY Queen Martha Stewart that made our first attempt pretty simply. Difficulty factor: 2/10 (but it takes a long time. Have some wine and good tunes on hand while you’re cutting out all of those pesky ribs). 

Step 1: 
Print out the template. Fold the shirt in half to figure out where the centre line is (we like precision).



Step 2: 
Place beneath the shirt. If it’s moving around on you, tape it in place, because you gotta trace that bad boy. Trace the pattern with your soft pencil. Try and keep the pencil lines as light as you can, to make it easier to cut out without leaving any traces behind after.



Step 3:
Repeat above on the other side of the shirt, taking care to make sure the two sides line up. 


Step 4: 
Cut away! Cut out the parts that correspond with the black parts on the stencil – that is, the “spaces” in between the ribs. Take your time, but don’t worry about it being perfect. You are making a torn shirt, after all.


Step 5: 
Wear and collect admiring glances this summer. 

DIY #2: Woven V
This one looks super complicated, but it actually took less time than the one above. The cutting part is super speedy, while the woven effect is a bit trickier. Difficulty factor: 4/10 – we had to play around with weaving the back a few times, but once you get it, it’s a breeze. 

Step 1: 
Lay shirt out and fold *just the back* in half. If you fold the whole shirt in half, you’ll cut through the front. That’s a little too much exposed skin, in our opinion.


Step 2: 
Grab a rule or tape measure to use as a straight line to cut against. Lay it in a “V” along the edge of the shirt, up to the collar. The wider the V, the more exposed your back will be. Pick how much cut-out you’d like and grab your scissors.



Step 3:
Start cutting pinkly-width strips down the shirt, cutting all the way to the ruler. Again, don’t worry about jagged edges or crooked lines – they’ll just add to the effect.



Step 4:
Once you’re done cutting all the way down to the bottom of the V, grab each strip and stretch it out. This makes the cotton roll under, which hides the jagged edges and opens up the spaces between strips. 

Once you’re done stretching out the strips, your shirt should look like this.

Step 5:
This is where it was get a bit trickier. You can either leave it as is, or attempt to weave the back to add a little pizazz. 

To do this, you grab the top strip and the second strip. Pull the second strip under the first and over the top – the second strip should now be at the top of the shirt. Repeat this with the third strip – grab it and pull it under the second and over the top, so now the third strip is at the top of the shirt. Repeat all the way down; you will start to see a pattern forming on either side of the V. 


Step 6: 
Once you’re done weaving all the way to the bottom, cut the very last strip in half and use it to tie the weave off. Tie each half of the cut strip to the strip above to hold your weave in. 

We really liked the look of double weaving it, so we repeated steps 5 and 6 above. Then we realized our shirt looked a little business in the front, party in the back with the V-neck collar in place, so we cut that off to make the front a little edgier. This is the final result: 
Ta da! We’re excited to wear these to Field Trip this summer, to drink tall boys in Trinity Bellwoods, the beach off Toronto Island and backyard BBQ’s. Basically, to any event that involves sunshine and warm weather.

Rant and rave: Songs we should not have been singing as children

Did you know
there are over 6,500 distinct languages in the modern world? B
eing the articulate wordsmiths that we are, it kinda blows our
mind when we think about how many other humans there are that we simply
can’t communicate with. That’s why we love music, the universal
language. If there is anything that makes sense to everyone, it’s a phat beat.
No matter where or how old you are, ain’t no other experience in the world as
simultaneously personal and unifying than appreciating a piece of music and
that’s great, right? Let’s all just spend a couple minutes looking at babies dancing. Okay. What could possibly be wrong with this? OH YEAH, LIKE 85% OF
POPULAR MUSIC IS ABOUT SEXUAL INTERCOURSE. Suddenly by accident, we’ve got all
this innuendo spilling from the mouths of babes! Think we’re exaggerating? Take
a walk with us, through dance parties of yore. Revisiting the lyrics of some of
these teeny bopper tunes, we’re no longer surprised our moms went grey early.


O-Town – Liquid
Dreams

Hooo boy, did
we ever love watching this boy band come to life on Making the Band every Friday on ABC (and again two months ago when
we realized all the episodes are on YouTube). The emotional turmoil of a bunch
of adult dudes living in a house together just trying to make it as popstars,
the beginning of reality television as we know it, Jacob Underwood’s facial hair/attempt at white-guy dreadlocks – truly revolutionary stuff. So when they
came out with their first official single as a fully formed band about their
DREAM GIRL, we were so excited to sing along that we didn’t really even stop to
think. Liquid Dreams? What the what?! The song lists all of the boys’ fave
celebs and their body parts and mashes them all together to make one super babe
(although it’s not all superficial, they do mention they want her to have a
good personality-like Halle B,), who stars in their liquid dreams. That’s just gross, you
guys.  

B4-4 – Get Down

In this
little ditty, a pair of male twins and a guy named Ohad came together to fill
our adolescent minds with promises of being the ones to love and comfort us
until the day we die. It’s a happy-go-lucky tune with such a cool built-in
dance routine that we probably didn’t notice sideways looks from our parents
when we were belting out “I’m gonna make
you come tonight
over to my
house”.
We’re all adults here (now), and we realize that this little “game
of give and take” is just really creative propaganda for oral sex. We’d also
like to note that twins Ryan and Dan are now billed as pop/classical/opera
vocal duo RyanDan and are performing in Las Vegas at Caesars Palace with Shania Twain for the next two years.

Spice Girls –
2 Become 1

Luckily
everyone under the age of 14 skips all the slow jams, so this song about
revisiting a former lover more or less went under the radar [Ed. note: speak for yourself! Some of us loved this song when it came out]. Now if we just put
this in text form at 2 a.m., it would make a pretty impressive drunk booty
call. Although we don’t agree with pre-teens asking “are you as good as I remember, baby? Get it on, get it on” we
gotta give props for also alluding to the importance of safe sex “be a little bit wiser baby. Put it on. Put
it on.”
Well done, ladies. Unrelated note – if anyone knows the story with
the hologram deer at the end of the video, we’d love to know what that was all
about.

Next – Too
Close

An elementary
school dance staple, this touching duet between a man and a woman discusses the
intimacy of young love and relationships moving too fast. Just kidding, it’s
about boners.  Poor mid-pubescent boys going
through the terrible NRB phase probably really related to this grinding anthem (“Girl I know you felt it, but oh ya know I
can’t help it”)
while being misled by girls who had no idea what this song
was actually about.

Salt n Pepa –
Push It

This song isn’t about dancing.


*This post is titled Rant and Rave, because we can’t quite decide whether it really was a good or a bad thing that we were singing these songs as pre-pubescent teens.








Rant: Dressing for Unseasonable Weather

Listen, we feel you. We’re sick of talking about the weather too. At this point, we’re seriously thinking about starting a class action lawsuit and make Punxsutawney “Fibber” Phil rue the (Groundhog) day he ever missed his shadow. Last time we’re ever going to listen to a rodent. So yes, we appreciate that it’s confusing to be donning your Canada Goose in the Easter Parade, but this is no excuse for some of the sartorial disasters we’ve been spotting around the city.


You’re telling us. 

Sandals + Snow = mortal enemies 

Thankfully the days of trudging through snowbanks in our Sorels seem to be behind us (until October, at least). While this may seem like a sign to call up your pedicurist and break out your new sandals, but please, for the love of all things holy, don’t. Use this as a chance to wear your suede booties without fear of slush. Sport your spindliest stilettos and stare straight ahead – there’s no ice in sight! But when Mother Nature plays an April Fool’s joke on us and delivers flurries in the “springtime” maybe skip the gladiator sandals.  
Cute look from our style icon.
Who wears short shorts (in 10 degrees)? 
Raise your hand if you’re sick of wearing black tights? While we’re eternally grateful to Joe Fresh for keeping us stocked up on affordable, durable stockings all winter long, we are sooo ready to show some skin. That being said, we also realize that immediate gratification is a plague destroying the fabric of our society. There is nothing more infuriating than seeing a pair of Daisy Dukes atop pasty white legs the very day the temperature hits double digits. Start with some bare ankles and slowly work your way up. While you’re at it, invest in some self-tanner for the (20 degree plus) day you debut that pretty little sundress you picked up in January.

Nice day for tanning, bro. 
A little jacket wouldn’t kill ya. 
In high school we remember asserting our independence by refusing to zip up our winter coats or wear toques. As adults, we’ve suffered through enough bouts of flu to realize how idiotic this is. We’ll give people the benefit of being caught off guard (we’ll get to this more later) by the temperature to excuse why they’re shivering in their jean jacket waiting for the streetcar. However, in this unpredictable April we encourage you to borrow an autumn style trick and layer, layer, layer. Throw a chubby knit sweater on under your jean jacket, if you’re insistent on packing away the parka. Unlike weight loss, it’s always easier to lose some layers than add them on. 

Saturday night steez.

“Always prepared.” The Boy Scouts of America & you
We’ve got a crazy idea: let’s all adopt new New Year’s resolutions. How about we resolve to check the weather forecast before getting dressed in the morning? You know, the weather forecast; the thing you can find on the news. Or on your phone, the Internet, in the newspaper or on the radio. The greatest thing about this is that you’ll stop having people stare at you in disbelief on your morning commute or suffer the indignity of having us write a blog post making fun of you, ever again. Happy spring!

Happy trails!

Yum, yum: Fortuna Mezcal

“Champagne is for the rich. Fortuna is for the wise.” 


These words greet you on the Fortuna Mezcal website, and we quite agree. We had the chance to try Fortuna Mezcal during Fortuna Week a few weeks ago, at a tasting held by the creator of the brand, Don Ignacio. We sat rapt as he walked us through the making, distilling and tasting process of this alcohol and explained the differences between tequila and his sustainable, artisanal mezcal, and also the taste differences between the various types (white, dorado, reposado and añejo) and proofs of mezcal. 



Basically, most mezcal comes from the Oaxaca region of Mexico, and is created using a specific type of agave plant – the maguey, vs. the blue agave that tequila is made with. It has a strong, smooth, smokey flavour and is typically taken just straight up. We were a bit concerned about this form of tasting at first (bad university memories of cheap Jose Cuervo flooding back) but were surprised by just how smoothly and easily it went down. 

What we especially liked about Fortuna is their commitment to sustainability, responsible growing and harvesting practices, and giving back to the Oaxaca region of Mexico, in order to preserve the longstanding tradition of mezcal making in the community. More details here.



We also discovered that you can use this spirit to make delicious cocktails and in honour of it being Friday, thought we’d share one of our favourite mezcal recipes with you. As they say, “para todo mal, mezcal, y para todo bien también” – “for everything bad, mezcal, and for everything good, as well.” So whether you’re celebrating the end of a great week or drowning your sorrows, kick off your weekend with a Fresco de Fortuna


¡Salud!

All images courtesy of Fortuna Mezcal.


Media, Darling: Shinan Govani

Shinan Govani is the National Post‘s resident snoop and people watcher. In addition to frequent television appearances and being Page Six‘s “go-to-Canadian,” Govani has also appeared in such publications as Salon, Details, New York, Fashion, and enRoute. “Shinan is to celebrity what the Bank of Canada is to the dollar,” Toronto Life once said. His beat has him meandering across umpteenth different types of scenes, in Canada and beyond, whether it’s the Art Basel scene in Miami, Fashion Week in Paris, the film festival circuit c/o Sundance/Cannes/Toronto, the society set, the chef crowd, etc. Earlier this year, he attended Vanity Fair‘s famous Oscar night party in L.A. – the only Canadian journalist to be invited inside the party.


Photo Credit: Sisi Penaloza
Website: National Post
Twitter: @shinangovani, @nationalpost


Did you always want to be in the media? If not, what other careers were on the horizon?
I can’t remember not being a media-phile and know-it-all, but I didn’t always know how it would translate into a career. Always had varied interests – including politics, culture, style, food – and the great thing about journalism, per se, is that one can minor in all those subjects at once, if one wishes. More specifically, for me, most of my interests in all subjects pivoted around the people in various tribes, so winding up with the kind of column I write is no accident. I’ve always subscribed to Jonathan Swift’s famous dictum: “Character is plot,” i.e. I believe all great stories – be they world events, or tabloid tales, or what not – come down to people. Their vanities, their hang-ups, their childhoods, their reaches for validation, etc.
I will also add that I was always the guy who’d have anxiety attacks when I passed newsstands, fretting about what I hadn’t yet read, as well as the kid with the flashlight under the blanket reading a book way, way after bedtime.
Where would you like to be five years from now?
More books, for sure (my first novel, Boldface Names, came out a few years ago). I’d like to maybe take a stab at writing biographies at some point. Also, I want to continue to give back, socially-speaking, having played in this crazy playground for so many years – continue to contribute in causes such as AMFAR (I co-chaired its annual gala in Toronto for two years, through which we raised close to two million dollars). I want to go live in Venice, Italy for a spell, but in the winter. I see it very clearly: Venice. In the winter. When the hordes of tourists have poofed, and the city is supposed to be the most hypnotic (it’s when the moisture from the sea hits the chill, creating a haze off the canals that filters the suns into variations of pink and gold). 
Also: I’d like to get around to making bread. But just once.
Any advice for people getting started in your industry?
Read and write. And write and read.
What are your favourite media outlets, not including your own? 
I am a veritable Cookie Monster when it comes to media-consumption, so, in addition to many of the obvious (the Page Six-es and the Vanity Fairs) I’ll just throw a few things, at the top of my head, and in no particular order: some fun podcasts on KCRW, out of L.A., including Elvis Mitchell’s showbiz-insider, ‘The Treatment’ as well as the quite charming ‘Good Food’; Tatler out of the U.K. (required reading in my field); the weekend Financial Times (love the ‘Lunch With’ column, and David Tang’s high-larious advice column!); anything Camille Paglia or Ingrid Sischy or Bob Collacello; everything Daily Mail; the Daily Beast (much better curated than the Huffington Post); the Great Lives series on BBC4; columnists, far and wide, like Maureen Dowd, David Carr and Cathy Horyn in the New York Times, AA Gill in the London Times, Emily Nussbaum and Anthony Lane in The New Yorker, Mike Musto in The Village Voice; Arts & Letters Daily online; the Slate Culture Gabfest; Fashion Police on E! (I would never dare miss an episode!); Hardball; Rachel Maddow; the ‘At Issue’ panel on CBC’s The National; all the great aggregators on New York mag (The Cut, Grub Street, Vulture, etc); NewYorkSocialDiary.com (where the great gossipist Liz Smith still is going and writing!); Barbara Amiel in Maclean’s (I won’t even try to resist!)…NPR’s ‘Fresh Air’ (I worship Terri Gross!)…AdweekSalonPolitico…Richard Lawson on theatlantic.com…Jason Gay on tennis in the Wall Street Journal…Roger Friedman’s Showbiz 411 column online…and it goes on. (Oh, how I miss Christopher Hitchens).
Special shout-out to Bon Appetit magazine, which, I believe, is the most-improved glossy, with Adam Rapport as editor. In many ways, it’s the best culture mag out there!
Best interview you’ve ever had?
Having tea with Jackie Collins, one-on-one inside the Plaza Athene in New York, was pretty nifty. But maybe ’cause it was just last month that I remember it so fondly. (I’ve been at this for a while!)
Worst?
Linda Evangelista. What a bore! Definitely proof positive that models, in most cases, lose all their power when they speak.
Best advice you’ve ever been given?
Plus ça change. Also: “You’re never as good as your best review, and never as bad as your worst.”e
As Good As Your Best Review, And Never As Bad As Your Worst’ –
What rule(s) do you live your life by?
Oh, why the hell not?
What’s the most important tip you can give PR pros?
Bikram yoga.
Best experience you’ve had with a PR pro? We love to hear about #wins.
All my best experiences with PR pros have occurred through genuine relationships developed over my years of doing this. Let me be frank: in the context of a social column, it’s all about back-scratching and, well, that thing called chemistry. A press release is probably the least effective way of getting my attention. A publicist who can craft a story angle, or at least lead the horse (me!) to water with it, will definitely get my attention faster. A publicist who has given me a scoop on a matter something/someone that’s not a client, or is occasionally the source of intel, will get my attention when they need something from me! More specifically: my particular column is all boldface-oriented, so a fast-thinking PR will mould a story, or a mention, in a way that has boldface potential. In New York or L.A., when I hear from PRs, they’ll often send me the pitch, in proper paragraph form, having boldfaced the names in themselves, so I immediately get the pic. This doesn’t happen often in Toronto.
I hate?
Debbie Downers. And raisins.
I love?
People who can see and appreciate all the colours. And spicy food that makes me weep.
Reading?
Crazy Rich Asians, an advance-copy of a novel that I think is going to be huge. It’s out in June. It’s kind of like a Chinese Dallas meets a Chinese Real Housewives meets a Chinese Royal Tenenbaums. I also have a pretty interesting biography on the go: Constance: The Tragic and Scandalous Life of Mrs. Oscar Wilde.
Best place on earth?
The Maldives – primarily because I’ve never been. (The mind provides the best excursions!)
Hero?
Victoria Grayson.
Pool or ocean?
Ocean.
Voicemail or email?
Email. (Or tweet!)